Boy Scouts of AmericaTroop 181 Bradenton, Florida

             ADULT TRAINING CERTIFICATIONS &                   MEDICAL CERTIFICATIONS

Please update your Training Certifications and provide copies of all certifications to either Douglas Shepard.

Medical Forms and Certifications, please provide all forms to Gina Perea.

1.  NOTE: ALL Leaders must have completed all required Training to go to Summer Camp Effective May 1, 2010.

2.  NOTE: Effective September 1,  2013, ONLY registered Adults with completed Training will be allowed on Troop Activities or Troop Camping.  Thank You - Please get trained for the Scouts

Req. YPT (2 Years); CPR  (2-3 Years);  First Aid  (2 Years);  Req.Trek Safety (2 Years); Req.Weather Hazards (2 Years);Req. if Climbing activity & Summer Camp Climb on Safety (2 Years); Req.Physical Wellness  (2 Years); Req.This is Scouting (Lifetime), Req.Boy Scout FastStart Training (Lifetime), Troop Committee Challenge  (Lifetime);  Unit Coordinator  (Lifetime);  Scoutmaster Training (Lifetime);  OLSI (Lifetime), BSA Aquatics Supervisor (3+Years); BSA Lifeguard (3+ Years);; Req. If Boating Activity & Summer Camp Safe Swim Defense (2 Years);Req. If Boating Activity & Summer Camp Safety Afloat (2 Years); Rifle BB & Archery (2 Years); Merit Badge Counselor (Lifetime);  Baloo  (Lifetime).

Leaders please note: Only Boy Scout applicable training is listed - Youth Protection Training (YPT) (MANDATORY FOR EVERYONE); This is Scouting, Boy Scout Fast Start Training, Trek Safety; Weather Hazards; Climb on Safety; Physical Wellness; Safe Swim & Safety Afloat are MANDATORY for all adults to be able to go camping, CPR & First Aid are highly recommended).  A  highlight means that your training is currently invalid for YPT & You Cannot do any troop activities or go Camping with the Troop.   A highlight means that ONE or all of your additional training are currently invalid and must be updated to particiapte in the specific Troop activities and Camping after September 1, 2013.    A Highlighted area means that an area has either already expired or that it will before July 2013 summer camp.  PLEASE update your training and see Doug Shepard   ASAP.  Training not updated before summer camp will be dropped from the troop Roster and not allowed to attend summer camp or other camping activities.

 

Allan Baily: YPT  9/9/15; CPR  ********; First Aid  *******; Trek Safety  9/24/15; Weather Hazards  9/25/15; Climb on Safety  9/24/15; Physical Wellness  5/1/13; BSA Aquatics Supervisor  ********; BSA Lifeguard  7/11/09*; Safe Swim Defense 9/24/15; Safety Afloat  9/24/15; Rifle BB & Archery  *******;     This is Scouting 3/2/12; Boy Scouts Training 3/2/12; Troop Committee Challenge 3/9/11; Unit Coordinator *******; Scoutmaster Training 3/17/09; OLSI 10/21/2011, Merit Badge Counselor  11/15/06, Baloo  2/23/02.  

          ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION 5/8/15.

 

"AJ" Baily YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX, This is Scouting 5/7/13; Boy Scouting Fast Start 5/8/13; Troop Committee Challenge 5/8/13; Unit Coordinator *******; Scoutmaster Training *******; Merit Badge Counselor *******, Baloo *******.

          ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION 5/8/15.

 

Expired David Behnke: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

          ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

ExpiredKyle Cleland: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

          ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

ExpiredRichard Cleland: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting 12/28/07; Boy Scouting Fast Start 12/28/07; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training 12/28/07; Merit Badge Counselor 11/15/06, Baloo XXXXXX.

         ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

ExpiredChris Colaco: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

Jamie Lewis: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting 4/4/12; Boy Scouting Fast Start 12/28/07; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training 10/17/09; Merit Badge Counselor 11/15/06, Baloo 10/8/05.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Expired Wyatt Lewis: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX. 

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Pam Lewis: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting 4/5/12; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor 11/16/06, Baloo 2/23/02.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX. 

 

Expired Peter Livingston: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Expired Cliff Manrodt: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Expired Tiffany Manrodt: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Kim O'Dowd: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting 4/16/09; Boy Scouting Fast Start 4/16/09; Troop Committee Challenge 9/24/09; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training 10/17/09; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

ExpiredGina Perea: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

ExpiredDana Puig: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Douglas Shepard: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting 5/11/11; Boy Scouting Fast Start 10/15/10; Troop Committee Challenge 10/15/10; Unit Coordinator 6/2/11; Scoutmaster Training 2/19/11; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo 10/18/08.  

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Expired Charlotte Theilen: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Expired Cathy Zebracki: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

 

Expired Richard Zebracki: YPT XXXXXX, CPR XXXXXX; First Aid XXXXXX, Trek Safety XXXXXX; Weather Hazards XXXXXX; Climb on Safety XXXXXX; Physical Wellness XXXXXX; Safe Swim Defense XXXXXX; Safety Afloat XXXXXX; This is Scouting XXXXXX; Boy Scouting Fast Start XXXXXX; Troop Committee Challenge XXXXXX; Unit Coordinator XXXXXX; Scoutmaster Training XXXXXX; Merit Badge Counselor XXXXXX, Baloo XXXXXX.

        ANNUAL MEDICAL CERTIFICATION XX/XX/XX.

I n t r o d u c t i o n  t o  L e a d e r s h i p  S k ills  f o r  T r o o p s

Introduction to This Course—

The First Steps in the Youth

Leadership Continuum

The purpose of the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops course is to teach Scouts with

leadership positions about their new roles and how to most effectively reach success in that

role. It is intended to help Boy Scouts in leadership positions within their troop understand

their responsibilities and to equip them with organizational and leadership skills to fulfill those

responsibilities. Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops is the first course in the series of

leadership training offered to Boy Scouts and is a replacement for Troop Leadership Training.

Completion of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops is a prerequisite for Boy Scouts to

participate in the more advanced leadership courses National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT)

and the National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE). It is also required to participate

in a Kodiak Challenge Trek.

Leadership in Boy Scouting

Leadership is a vital part of the Scouting program. Boy Scouts in positions of leadership run the

troop. They take care of the many tasks necessary for troop and patrol meetings and activities

to run smoothly. By accepting the responsibilities of troop leadership, Scouts are preparing

themselves to be leaders throughout their lives.

Opportunities to develop leadership skills are every bit as important, if not more important,

to Boy Scouts and to Scouting in general as any recognition or advancement program. Scouting

offers young people a rich and varied arena in which to learn and use leadership skills. It is also

a way to keep Boy Scouts interested and involved—keep them busy, organized, and trained, and

give them opportunities to lead.

Among the activities encountered by a troop’s leaders are

• Organizing the troop

• Planning and organizing activities and meetings

• Assigning duties to others

• Planning menus and figuring out food costs

• Encouraging advancement

• Guiding a troop’s involvement in problem-solving

• Teaching outdoor, sports, or craft skills

• Ensuring the troop’s safety during meetings and outings

• Handling the troop’s finances

• Helping other Boy Scouts make the most of their own leadership opportunities

• Encouraging participation

The badge of office presented to a Boy Scout who is accepting a position of troop

leadership does not automatically make him a good leader.

As part of the Youth Training Continuum, Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops provides

the core unit-level leadership skills every Scout leader should know. This is followed by the

National Youth Leadership Training course, which expands on the skills learned in Introduction

to Leadership Skills for Troops and provides Scouts with more advanced leadership skills and

experience during a six-day course delivered in an outdoor setting. The National Advanced

Youth Leadership Experience is an exciting program that allows NYLT graduates to enhance their

I n t r o d u c t i o n t o L e a d e r s h i p S k ills f o r T r o o p s

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leadership skills in the Philmont backcountry. NAYLE offers Scouts an unforgettable wilderness

experience as they use leadership and team-building skills to resolve exciting and challenging

backcountry situations. Last, the Kodiak Challenge offers Scouts an opportunity to reinforce their

leadership skills on an exciting trek adventure. Scouts may participate in a Kodiak Challenge Trek

after they have completed any of these three trainings, but the Introduction to Leadership Skills for

Troops is required.

About This Course

Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops is a guide meant to offer the Scoutmaster and senior

patrol leader a flexible training program for troop leaders. It is not a syllabus to be followed

verbatim; every troop is different. Trainers can review the resource material and adapt it to their

individual troop’s needs.

Training Boy Scouts to be leaders is an ongoing process that begins immediately when a

Scout accepts a leadership position in his troop. Leadership experiences can be frustrating and

disappointing for a Scout who is not given the knowledge, skills, and encouragement that he must

have to fulfill his leadership assignment. It is the Scoutmaster’s responsibility to make sure the

Scout has all the necessary tools and to coach and mentor the Scout to be successful.

Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops is organized into three modules, each of which

should take 60 to 90 minutes to complete, with additional optional games and challenges to

enhance the leadership lessons (and fun) of the course.

• Module One—Troop Organization includes a description of each leadership position in

the troop, including roles and responsibilities, troop organization, and introductions to vision

and servant leadership.

• Module Two—Tools of the Trade covers some core skill sets to help the Scout lead,

including communicating, planning, and teaching.

• Module Three—Leadership and Teamwork incorporates additional leadership tools for

the Scout, including discussions of teams and team characteristics, the stages of team

development and leadership, inclusion/using your team, ethics and values of a leader, and a

more in-depth review of vision.

This course may be conducted over three different days, one module at a time, perhaps

before a regular troop meeting that incorporates some of the optional games. The course may

also be conducted in one session. If this single-day format is used, it is important to include

several breaks for two reasons: Without breaks, participants will become overloaded and bored;

and participants often benefit from being able to immediately spend some time thinking about,

discussing, and even applying new leadership skills to their positions (perhaps by writing goals or

brainstorming about new activity ideas).

A preferred option is to spread this course over a weekend activity with meals, camping, or

other activities interspersed between the modules. Make the Introduction to Leadership Skills for

Troops experience a fun event for the entire troop to look forward to.

Before the Course:

Personal Coaching

The first step in Scouting leadership training is introducing the Scouts to the positions they have

agreed to fill. This introduction is an important occasion to give new Scout leaders the clear

message that they have the ability to handle the position, that they are trusted, and that they

can get all of the support and guidance they need to succeed. The introduction gives the Scout

leaders an immediate overview of their obligations and opportunities as leaders and sets them off

on the right foot toward success.

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In most cases, the Scoutmaster is the one who can most effectively conduct this introduction

for the senior patrol leader and other new troop leaders. The Scoutmaster may call on other adult

or Scout leaders to conduct the introduction for each troop position.

The next step in the Scout’s training is Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops, which

provides them with a broader understanding of the troop and ways they can work with other

troop leaders to make the troop a success, and gives them strategies for dealing with many of the

challenges they are likely to face.

When to Conduct This Course

When a Scout takes on a new leadership position in the troop, he will immediately want to know

what is expected of him and how he can fulfill his leadership obligations successfully. Although

curious about the concept of leadership, the Scouts might not know who to approach or even

what questions to ask. The three Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops modules have been

developed to help Scout leaders understand their roles and to provide them with a foundation for

successfully executing their leadership responsibilities.

Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops should be conducted immediately or shortly after

a new term of office begins. If there will be a delay of more than a few weeks between the start

of the new term and this course, then the Scoutmaster should conduct a leaders orientation right

after the election of new Scout leaders.

The length of terms of office varies from troop to troop (and even from year to year within a

troop). Ultimately, it’s up to your troop to determine when to conduct Introduction to Leadership

Skills for Troops.

This training is most constructive when attended by six or more Scouts. If the troop is small

and does not have enough Scout leaders for an effective session, work with the troop committee

to identify other troops in the area with whom you can organize a cluster-training event.

Upon completion of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops, the Scout is qualified to

wear the "Trained" emblem on his uniform.

Who Participates in This Course?

This course is for every Scout in the troop who holds a leadership position, including all elected

positions and any appointed positions at the discretion of the senior patrol leader. In some troops,

this might mean that this course is for every Scout! In fact, it’s desired that every member of the

troop have some kind of leadership responsibility every year, even if it’s just a minor responsibility.

While there is content in Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops that will help adults to

serve the troop effectively, this isn’t the course for them. Scoutmaster and Assistant Scoutmaster

Leader Specific Training and Wood Badge for the 21st Century are the appropriate courses

for adults to attend to receive troop operations and leadership training. Adults may participate

peripherally in Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops as trainers or passive observers. In

some cases, it might even be fun and valuable to let a group of adults execute some of the games

and see how they compare to the youth groups in performance.

It is strongly preferred that all Scout leaders participate in this course at the start of each term

of office, even if they have participated before, and even if they are filling the same leadership

position. It is beneficial for the group of Scout leaders to go through this course together, even

if only some of them are new leaders. Two key purposes of this course are the establishment of

personal goals for each Scout leader and the effective formation of the leadership team. Both of

these purposes are best achieved if all the Scout leaders do this together.

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A troop with experienced Scout leaders who have been through this course before should

consider using prior graduates as trainers for some of the segments or as facilitators for some of

the games and challenges in this course. Scout leaders who have previously graduated from Troop

Leadership Training, Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops, or National Youth Leadership

Training can also be utilized, especially in modules two and three.

Message to the Scoutmaster—

Your Role as a Leader

It is the Scoutmaster’s privilege and responsibility to organize and lead Introduction to Leadership

Skills for Troops. You may also want or need to involve other trained adult leaders—and of

course, you should involve previously trained Scouts. As you train the troop leadership team

with Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops, you and your Scout leaders will gain a greater

sense of mutual trust and, ideally, see how useful a shared style of leading will be in the troop.

Yes, Scouting is designed to be as youth-led as possible, but don’t forget that the Scoutmaster

does have a role to play as well.

The Scoutmaster is part of the team being built, so it is imperative that the Scoutmaster is

actively involved in the training exercise. Wherever possible, include the troop’s trained Scout

leadership in presenting the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops course material. Have

experienced Scouts teach less-experienced Scouts; one of the best ways to thoroughly learn a

subject is to teach it. The senior patrol leader should have a prominent role if he has previously

received this training. Scouts who have attended NYLT may also be an excellent source for

instructors. Adult leaders with specific roles within the troop to coach and mentor specific Scout

leaders should also be involved (e.g., quartermaster, chaplain).

Do note that while we aim to have our youth leaders lead, we do not abdicate all responsibility

to the Scouts. Adults must play a critical role in advising, providing feedback, and guidance, and

they are in fact responsible for the troop. Scouts do not call all the shots just because they are

Scouts. Adults need to work in concert with our young leaders, allowing them the freedom to learn

from mistakes but also providing guidance as needed.

Remember the three basic roles of the Scoutmaster: to ensure that the rules and standards of

the chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America are followed, to serve as a mentor and

role model to the Scouts, and to train Scout leaders.

Preparing to Conduct Introduction

to Leadership Skills for Troops

It is wise to schedule this course into your troop’s annual calendar well before elections are

conducted. This way, each Scout knows in advance that he will be expected to participate in this

course when he accepts a leadership position.

Be sure to use former graduates or trainers of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops to

deliver segments of this course. In a troop where none are available for your course, consider

using someone from another troop who is, or find someone who has been through a similar or

more advanced leadership course, such as Troop Leadership Training, NYLT, or NAYLE.

A few supplies are needed to conduct this course, all of which are all easy to obtain, but not

on a moment’s notice. A kit can easily be built that will serve a troop every time it conducts this

course. In several places, there are times to choose an activity. Try to change which activities are

used each time this course is conducted to keep it original and fun for repeat participants. You will

need position patches and Trained strips, available from your Scout shop, for each participant to

wear on his Scout uniform.

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To assist you in preparing and conducting this training, each module includes the following:

• Module overview, including time needed (for either 60- or 90-minute sessions)

• Preparation, or the pre-work to do before teaching the module

• Materials needed

• Core module training, including content, participant games/experiences, reflection topics,

teaching points, and leader comments

To help ensure productive training sessions, do the following:

• Review the materials well ahead of time and determine who should assist in presenting the

training. Wherever possible, use adults and Scouts who are BSA-trained for their position.

• Determine which initiative games and experiences to include in each module.

• Set times, dates, and locations that are convenient for the adult and Scout leaders who

will attend.

• Choose a location with comfortable seating and enough space. Review the games and

experiences planned for the module you are teaching, and ensure the room/location is

suitable for each planned activity.

• Review the concepts of Teaching EDGE and the Trainer’s EDGE to aid you in your

teaching skills.

• Prepare the training aids you will need to conduct the session and have them on hand well

in advance.

• Plan and practice how you will present each portion of the session.

• Rehearse with any assistant trainers, if needed.

• Double-check that you have enough fun, variety, and activity in the planned training to keep

the Scouts’ attention and interest. Make it fun to learn to lead!

• Schedule 60 to 90 minutes for each session, but remain flexible in how long the group

spends on each phase of its training. Give Scouts plenty of time to complete discussions

and ask questions. But, if a portion of the session begins to drag, move on.

Preparing the

Senior Patrol Leader

The Scoutmaster should conduct the introduction for the senior patrol leader. It is essential that

the Scoutmaster and senior patrol leader begin forming a team and gaining a sense of mutual

trust and understanding as soon as possible. If time permits, the Scoutmaster should conduct a

special training session with the senior patrol leader prior to the Introduction to Leadership Skills

for Troops session. This will enable the senior patrol leader to begin demonstrating leadership and

fulfilling his leadership role during the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops training.

Once Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops becomes an established troop activity that

occurs each time the troop transitions to a new leadership team, it will become common for the

new senior patrol leader to have already received Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops

training, and this session can simply be a refresher focusing on the specifics of the senior patrol

leader’s new role.

Where appropriate, encourage the Scouts to select a senior patrol leader and other senior

troop leaders who are NYLT graduates. The Scouts will significantly benefit when their senior

patrol leader has learned the advanced skills and concepts taught during NYLT.

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The following discussion should take place between the Scoutmaster and a new senior patrol

leader before the Module One—Introduction to Leadership session takes place. It is important

that a new senior patrol leader be trained first so he may fully participate in the training of other

Scout leaders.

Breaking the Ice

Make the first meeting either informal or formal, depending upon your personal style. Establish

a good working relationship with the new senior patrol leader. You may choose to get together

informally for the first meeting at a public coffee shop or restaurant. Be sure that all Youth

Protection policies concerning two-deep leadership are followed. Whichever you choose,

welcome the senior patrol leader to this special session. Explain that you will help him grow in this

role and in his leadership skills, as well as in his Scouting skills. He will grow in his ability to work

with peers and with adults, and he will make a substantial contribution to the Scouts in the troop.

Now ask him to mention some of the benefits that a young man can get from Scouting. He will

probably start with the fun things—camping, hiking, outdoor skills, trips, making friends. Guide

the senior patrol leader toward understanding Scouting’s role in developing personal growth—the

values of citizenship, character, ideals, and overall fitness. As the two of you discuss this, help him

understand that he is an important influence who can cause such growth to take place, and that a

major part of the senior patrol leader’s role is to influence other Scout leaders in a positive way.

Caution: Don’t bog down this discussion with trivial issues. Together, you as Scoutmaster and

he as the senior patrol leader will make the difference in whether the troop is an effective troop.

Explain that although it is your responsibility to give direction and support, he is the key leader.

Help the new senior patrol leader understand that everything the troop does should be as a result

of decisions made by the patrol leaders’ council, which he leads. Be quick to assure him that you

will have many opportunities to discuss things together, and that you will certainly be there to

help him.

Position Description

Give the senior patrol leader a pocket card for the position description. Explain that together, you

will walk through this summary of the chief duties to give him an overall idea of what this position

entails. Discuss each point individually. As you do so, encourage him to make comments and ask

questions. Encourage him to make notes. Some of these topics can generate exciting discussion,

but be careful not to let the meeting run too long.

Expectations

Tell the senior patrol leader that all of the points in the position description just discussed add

up to leadership and service. Make it clear that he is not required to DO everything that needs to

get done but is responsible for ensuring that everything GETS done. If needed, coach him on the

value and necessity of delegating to others. In addition to the position description, explain that you

expect the following:

• Live by the Scout Oath and the Scout Law.

• Agree on a written vision of success for his term of office and a plan to get there.

• Set a good example (uniform, language, behavior).

• Participate in Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops.

• Continue with his own advancement and recognition while serving as senior patrol leader.

• Devote the time necessary to handle the responsibilities of the position.

• Work with other troop leaders to make the troop successful.

• Attend the council National Youth Leadership Training course (a leadership growth

opportunity) if he has not already done so.

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Tell the senior patrol leader it is time to turn the discussion to what he can expect from you.

Explain that you have reviewed what he is expected to do, and it’s a big task, but he is not

expected to do it alone. He can expect the following from you:

• The two of you will have many meetings in preparation for this role.

• You will be available for discussions or phone calls (give best times).

• You will back up his decisions, within reason (give some examples).

• You will listen to his ideas.

• You will be fair.

• You will listen to all sides of any issue.

• You will set a good example (uniform, language, behavior, etc.).

• You will provide direction, coaching, and support.

• You will share a vision of success for the troop and a plan to get there. (Do this now.)

Resources

Refer to the description card for the senior patrol leader position and point out other materials

that are used in training other Scout leaders. Point out specific tools from the Senior Patrol

Leader Handbook.

Continuing Training

Almost everything the Scout does will contribute to his training. Much of his training will come

from mutual leadership and counsel during his tenure as senior patrol leader. Explain that this

training qualifies him to wear the Trained strip on his uniform after participation in Introduction

to Leadership Skills for Troops. Explain the role of the senior patrol leader to help conduct

the training.

Questions

Give the Scout an opportunity to ask questions. Answer them the best you can.

Follow Up

Be certain that you follow up frequently with the senior patrol leader, as you both agreed, so that

you can mutually evaluate each assignment. As time passes, review the plan for success to which

you both agreed and benchmark the progress. For his time in office, this senior patrol leader’s

success, in large part, will determine the troop’s success. Don’t let him fail. Ensure success.

Always be prepared for the next assignment at the troop meeting.

Relationship

Express to the Scout that this was a get-acquainted meeting and that you hope it will be the first

of many more meetings. Encourage his understanding and encourage him to discuss any thoughts

and concerns he may have. Be sincere; really mean it. Give the senior patrol leader a big smile,

and if appropriate, tell him how much you enjoyed the discussion.

Initiative Games

Including initiative games during the teaching of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops will

broaden the Scouts’ experience and help bring home key points in the training.

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Recommended initiative games and experiences/activities are listed in each module.

Alternative initiative games—to add variety for troops that routinely conduct Introduction to

Leadership Skills for Troops and have multiple Scouts who go through the course more than

once—are included in the appendix.

Initiative games and cooperative games are different from most games with which we are

familiar. What’s different is the way the participants play them. Initiative games are purposeful

activities with specific goals and learning processes that are less competitive and more

cooperative. They can best be described as "action and reflection" experiences. These games:

• Have a specific objective or objectives, such as cooperation, trust, or imagination, through

physical and verbal group activity.

• Are problem-solving in nature.

• Must be talked about or reflected upon to have the maximum impact on the participants.

• Are fun.

How to Use These Games and Skill Events

The following outline walks you through the steps you should consider in using the games.

Be Prepared!

Familiarize yourself with the activity you have chosen. Know how the game is played, what

the objectives are, and how its parts lead to learning the objective.

Plan a strategy ahead of time so you can help your Scouts if they get into trouble with

the game.

Determine space and equipment requirements. If you’re not sure what a particular game will

take, try it out ahead of time to avoid last-minute snags.

• Review the questions provided after each reflection. Think about some questions you can

add to the reflection following the activity. You may want to jot down some notes during the

game. Each activity has sample questions to get you started.

Present the Game

Make the rules clear. Be sure the Scouts understand the problem they must solve or the

skill to be learned before they begin. Emphasize that there should be no putdowns or

harassment during the activity.

Stand back. Let the Scouts solve the problem themselves. Even though you might know

a better solution, let them figure it out for themselves. They will learn the most from an

experience they have worked through on their own.

Lead the Reflection

Lay the ground rules for discussion. See below for how to conduct a reflection.

Facilitate the discussion. Be positive and ensure both the game and the reflection are fun

learning experiences.

Use thought-provoking questions. Be prepared. Know what you’re going to ask so you can

get the Scouts talking and draw out key lessons during the discussion. Each game is part

of the learning experience for the module, so be familiar with the teaching points that you

are trying to bring out in the reflection.

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How to Conduct a Reflection

In several places within this syllabus, trainers will be expected to conduct a "reflection." Often,

the reflection is the most meaningful part of an exercise. Reflecting on an activity should take no

more than a few minutes. The more you do it, the easier it becomes for both you and your Scouts.

Remember that the values of Scouting often lie beneath the surface. Reflection helps you ensure

that these values come through to your Scouts.

We can make our experiences more meaningful and effective if we reflect upon them.

In Scouting, reflection is simply the process of the Scouts talking about their experiences

immediately after an exercise or activity with a little bit of wise moderating.

In Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops, these reflections are how the teaching points

are brought out. Each game and activity in the course has a purpose and is a tool for enabling

the training. It is essential that you conduct meaningful and relevant reflections and draw out the

teaching points.

Reflection provides an opportunity for everyone in the group to have input into what happened.

Reflection is best accomplished by asking open-ended questions such as "What," "How," "When,"

and "Where." In reflection, there are no right or wrong answers, just ideas, opinions, and insights.

You can use reflections to evaluate troop activities, and it will result in improved engagement

by your Scouts in future planning and execution of activities. Leading reflections is a simple

process that can greatly enhance the learning process.

Lay the ground rules for discussion. Have the Scouts sit so they can see one another, and

ask them to agree not to interrupt or make fun of each other. Let them know they are free to keep

silent if they wish.

All participants should be reminded of the basic ground rules of reflections:

1. No putdowns allowed; every response is welcome and valid.

2. The person conducting the session should not show disapproval of a response or a person,

either verbally or nonverbally.

Facilitate the discussion. As the leader, avoid the temptation to talk about your own

experiences. Reserve judgment about what the Scouts say to avoid criticizing them. Help the

discussion get going, then guide the discussion to the teaching points through effective openended

questions. You want the teaching points to come from the Scouts, but you want them to

get to the key points. If you describe what you saw, be sure that your comments don’t stop the

participants from adding their own thoughts. Above all, be positive. Have fun with the activity and

with the reflection.

Use thought-provoking questions. Have some questions in mind prior to starting the

reflection. Know where you want the reflection to head and what lessons you want to ensure are

drawn out of it. The reflection discussion may often head in directions you had not thought of or

known about, but ensure it also covers the key concepts that you as the leader saw as important

to the training. The following types of questions are useful in reflecting:

Open-ended questions. Avoid questions that can be answered with a simple "yes" or "no." Ask

things like: "What was the purpose of the game?" and "What did you learn about yourself?"

Feeling questions require Scouts to reflect on how they feel about what they did. "How did

it feel when you started to pull together?"

Judgment questions ask Scouts to make decisions about things. "What was the best part?"

or ‘‘Why was it a good idea?"

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Guiding questions steer your Scouts toward the purpose of the activity and keep the

discussion focused. ‘‘What got you all going in the right direction?"

Closing questions help Scouts draw conclusions and end the discussion. ‘‘What did you

learn?" or ‘‘What would you do differently?"

Close the reflection. Wrap up the discussion and briefly summarize the key points and ideas

that were raised during the reflection.

The reflection facilitator acts as a moderator, initiating conversation by asking questions and

encouraging fruitful conversation that leads toward the objective of the teaching segment. When

a participant states an important point, it is worth repeating or restating to strengthen its impact

on the group, or seeking additional clarification or viewpoints. If the facilitator is successful in

getting the participants to state all the reflecting points provided in each game, then little followup

is needed beyond a summary statement. This is a very effective method of teaching because

the participants learn actively and because the trainer gets to hear the digested learning of the

participants and therefore knows if important lessons have been learned.

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Module One—Unit Organization

Module Overview

Content Time

Introduction to the Course—5 minutes

Introduction to Vision—5 to 10 minutes

Troop Organization—20 to 35 minutes

The Team-Based Troop—25 to 30 minutes

Introduction to Servant Leadership—5 to 10 minutes

Preparation

• Obtain or create a troop organization chart for your troop (see appendix), or use the

samples found in the Scoutmaster Handbook.

• Understand the roles and responsibilities for every leadership position in the troop. Identify

assistant trainers who may be needed to effectively review these roles and responsibilities.

Materials Needed

• A copy of the Patrol Leader Handbook for every patrol leader, or at least one copy per troop

as a reference

• Position description cards for every Scout leadership position

• Troop organization chart for your troop

• 10 to 20 balloons for the Role Balancing game

• A permanent extra-broad-tip marker

• A rigid lightweight stick or hula hoop for the Helium Stick game

• A white board, chalk board, or easel with a pad of paper (optional)

Learning Objectives

At the end of this module, participants will

• Understand the various leadership roles within the troop, both elected and appointed, as

well as the dynamics of having everyone be involved in the success of troop activities.

This course provides examples of troop organization charts and position descriptions, but each

troop is allowed to modify these assignments as long as all responsibilities are fulfilled and real

leadership remains a Scout role. It is important to have clearly defined responsibilities for each

troop position, so it is a requirement that each troop prepare appropriate materials by using those

provided by this course, modifying these materials, or creating original materials.

Core Module Training

Introduction to the Course

Discussion: Explain to the Scouts the purpose of this course.

The purpose of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops is to provide the foundational unit-level

leadership skills every Scout leader should know. The objective of ILST is to give each Scout a clearer

picture of how his position fits in the troop and how he can make a difference. It is also designed to

give him additional tools and ideas for fulfilling his role as a leader in the troop. We will discuss how the

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troop is organized and what other Scout leaders and adults each Scout can rely upon in his leadership

role. Then we’ll review some key leadership skills and ideas to help every Scout leader fulfill his role in

the troop. Explain where ILST fits in Scouting’s youth training continuum:

ILST to NYLT to NAYLE

Discuss any necessary logistics—when and where modules two and three will be taught, etc.

Tell the Scouts that they have been selected to be leaders in their troop. This is both an honor

and a responsibility. Being a leader is not about being the person in front, or wearing the patch, or

being the boss. Good leaders are not "all about themselves." They understand that the reason to

lead is because they can make a difference in the troop and help make those they lead successful

in their roles and in all they do.

The badges of office presented to each of the Scouts when accepting their position of troop

leadership did not automatically make them good leaders. The skills and information they learn

during Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops can help them get started in their leadership

experience. The Scout leaders who have already had leadership positions in the troop can

pick up new ideas during ILST and continue to develop their skills while serving in their new

positions. ILST will help each Scout leader gain the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill his

leadership assignment.

Introduction to Vision

Tell the Scouts that vision is critical to success in any role or project. You must first know what

success looks like before you can reach that success.

In Scouting, a troop’s vision is something developed and shared by all members. It identifies

where the troop is going—what it wants to accomplish. As an individual, you probably have a

number of visions, but you may not have articulated them. We will discuss vision more thoroughly

in Module Three, but each Scout should be thinking about his own vision of success in his new

position, as well as his vision for the troop.

Share the vision that the senior patrol leader and Scoutmaster created during their discussion.

Along with the rest of the troop, create some goals to help the troop reach this vision of success.

Ask each Scout to think about his vision and some likely goals as we continue, taking the time to

record or discuss them during breaks.

Troop Organization

Note: Show the troop organization chart for your troop. (Adapt your chart to the organization of

your troop; two models are provided for typical large and small troops.)

Notice that across the organizational chart, Scout positions are associated with adult positions:

The senior patrol leader works closely with the Scoutmaster; other troop leaders works closely

with other adults. No position is completely independent. Cooperation and teamwork between

adults and Scouts is essential.

Also notice that Scouts with leadership positions have responsibilities to one another. The

senior patrol leader manages other Scout leaders and is responsible for their performance. Elected

Scout leaders can have appointed Scout leaders to manage, and be responsible for, as well.

Your troop has a number of important Scout positions. The highest positions are elected and

serve for a period of time in those positions (a "term of office"). A number of appointed leadership

positions are available, with varying levels of skill and commitment required to fulfill.

Hopefully, every troop member will be encouraged to accept some kind of leadership position

every year in the troop.

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Individual Roles and Responsibilities

Note: Introduce and distribute position description.

Scout Positions. Scout troops are run by Scout leaders who are elected or appointed from

and by the troop’s Scout membership. These Scout leaders are responsible for seeing that the

troop runs well, grows, and meets the needs of the members. The number of Scout leaders can

change over time, depending on the size and needs of the troop. Following is a summary of the

responsibilities of each position in a typical troop. A position description card, the Boy Scout

Handbook, the Scoutmaster Handbook, and your Scoutmaster will provide additional details for

each position.

Senior Patrol Leader

• Preside at all troop meetings, events, activities, and annual program planning conference.

• Chair the patrol leaders’ council.

• Appoint Scout leaders with the advice and consent of the Scoutmaster.

• Assign duties and responsibilities to other Scout leaders.

• Work with the Scoutmaster in training Scout leaders.

• Set and enforce the tone for good Scout behavior within the troop.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

• Be responsible for training and giving direct leadership to the following appointed Scout

leaders: historian, Order of the Arrow troop representative, scribe, librarian, instructor,

quartermaster, and chaplain aide.

• Help lead meetings and activities as called upon by the senior patrol leader.

• Guide the troop in the senior patrol leader’s absence.

• Perform tasks assigned by the senior patrol leader.

• Function as a member of the patrol leaders’ council.

• Help set and enforce the tone for good Scout behavior within the troop.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Patrol Leader

• Plan and lead patrol meetings and activities.

• Keep patrol members informed.

• Assign each patrol member needed tasks and help them succeed.

• Represent the patrol at all patrol leaders’ council meetings and the annual program

planning conference.

• Prepare the patrol to take part in all troop activities.

• Show and help develop patrol spirit.

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• Work with other troop leaders to make the troop run well.

• Know what patrol members and other leaders can do.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

Assistant Patrol Leader

• Help the patrol leader plan and lead patrol meetings and activities.

• Help the patrol leader keep patrol members informed.

• Help the patrol leader prepare the patrol to take part in all troop activities.

• Lead the patrol in the patrol leader’s absence.

• Show and help develop patrol spirit.

• Represent the patrol at all patrol leaders’ council meetings in the patrol leader’s absence.

• Work with other troop leaders to make the troop run well.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

Troop Guide

• Introduce new Scouts to troop operations.

• Guide new Scouts through early Scouting activities.

• Help set and enforce the tone for good Scout behavior within the troop.

• Ensure older Scouts never harass or bully new Scouts.

• Help new Scouts earn the First Class rank in their first year.

• Coach the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol on his duties.

• Work with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings.

• Attend patrol leaders’ council meetings with the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol.

• Assist the assistant Scoutmaster with training.

• Coach individual Scouts on Scouting challenges.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

• Teach basic Scout skills.

Den Chief

• Serve as the activities assistant at den meetings.

• Meet regularly with the den leader to review the den and pack meeting plans.

• If serving as a Webelos den chief; help prepare boys to join Boy Scouting.

• Project a positive image of Boy Scouting.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

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• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Historian

• Gather pictures and facts about past activities of the troop and keep them in scrapbooks,

wall displays, or information files.

• Take care of troop trophies and keepsakes.

• Keep information about troop alumni.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Order of the Arrow Troop Representative

• Serve as a communication link between the lodge or chapter and the troop.

• Encourage year-round and resident camping in the troop.

• Encourage older-Scout participation in high-adventure programs.

• Encourage Scouts to actively participate in community service projects.

• Assist with leadership skills training in the troop.

• Encourage Arrowmen to assume leadership positions in the troop.

• Encourage Arrowmen in the troop to be active participants in lodge and/or chapter activities

and to seal their membership in the Order by becoming Brotherhood members.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath, Scout Law, and OA Obligation.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Librarian

• Establish and maintain a troop library.

• Keep records on literature owned by the troop.

• Add new or replacement items as needed.

• Have literature available for borrowing at troop meetings.

• Maintain a system to check literature in and out.

• Follow up on late returns.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Quartermaster

• Keep records of patrol and troop equipment.

• Keep equipment in good repair.

• Keep equipment storage area neat and clean.

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• Issue equipment and see that it is returned in good order.

• Suggest new or replacement items.

• Work with the troop committee member responsible for equipment.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Scribe

• Attend and keep a log of patrol leaders’ council meetings.

• Record attendance and dues payments of all troop members.

• Record advancement in troop records and on the troop advancement chart.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Work with the appropriate troop committee members responsible for finance, records,

and advancement.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

• Handle correspondence appropriately.

Instructor

• Instruct Scouting skills as needed within the troop or patrols.

• Prepare well in advance for each teaching assignment.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Chaplain Aide

• Keep troop leaders apprised of religious holidays when planning activities.

• Assist the troop chaplain or religious coordinator in meeting the religious needs of troop

members while on activities.

• Encourage saying grace at meals while camping or on activities.

• Lead worship services on campouts.

• Tell troop members about the religious emblems program for their faith.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Webmaster

• Establish and maintain a safe and secure troop website.

• Ensure the troop website is a positive reflection of Scouting for the public.

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• Manage the troop’s electronic communication tools.

• Work with the Scouts to provide up-to-date troop information.

• Work with the scribe.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Leave No Trace Trainer

• Have a thorough understanding of and commitment to Leave No Trace.

• Successfully complete the Leave No Trace Trainer training course.

• Help minimize the troop’s impact on the land by teaching Scouts the principles of

Leave No Trace.

• Help ensure that the troop follows Leave No Trace principles on outings.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster

• Function as an assistant Scoutmaster (except for leadership responsibilities reserved for

adults 18 and 21 years of age or older).

• Accomplish any duties assigned by the Scoutmaster.

• Set a good example.

• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.

• Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

• Show and help develop Scout spirit.

Adult Positions

Explain to the boys that adults in the troop are responsible for providing training to troop

leadership and enabling them to carry out their duties. They also provide resources for the

troop leaders and serve as mentors to all Scouts in the troop.

The number of adult leaders and committee members needed is dependent on the size and

needs of the troop. The Scoutmaster Handbook and attendance at regular district Scouting

program forums (sometimes known as Scouting roundtables) will provide additional details.

Scoutmaster

• Train and guide boy leaders.

• Work with other responsible adults to bring Scouting to boys.

• Use the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting.

• Meet regularly with the patrol leaders’ council for training and coordination in planning

troop activities.

• Attend all troop meetings or, when necessary, arrange for a qualified adult substitute.

• Attend troop committee meetings.

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• Conduct periodic parents’ sessions to share the program and encourage parent

participation and cooperation.

• Conduct Scoutmaster conferences for all rank advancements.

• Provide a systematic recruiting plan for new members and see that they are

promptly registered.

• Delegate responsibility to other adults and groups (assistants, troop committee) so they

have a real part in troop operations.

• Conduct all activities under qualified leadership, safe conditions, and the policies of the

chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America. As you see, the Scoutmaster has

many responsibilities.

Assistant Scoutmasters

To fulfill his or her obligation to the troop, the Scoutmaster, with the assistance of the troop

committee, recruits assistant Scoutmasters to help operate the troop. Each assistant Scoutmaster

is assigned specific program duties and reports to the Scoutmaster. They also provide the twodeep

leadership required by the Boy Scouts of America (there must be at least two adults present

at any Boy Scout activity). An assistant Scoutmaster may be 18 years old, but at least one in each

troop should be 21 or older so he or she can serve in the Scoutmaster’s absence.

Committee Chair

• Supervises the Scoutmaster and committee members.

• Recruits and approves Scoutmasters and committee members.

Committee Member

• Serves as a resource to the troop.

• Works with an assigned officer.

• Recruits consultants.

Chartered Organization Representative

• Serves as the liaison between the troop and the chartered organization.

• Recruits the troop committee; approves Scoutmasters and committee members.

• Participates in district leadership.

Institutional Head or Executive Officer

• Is the head of the chartered organization (may or may not be a Scouter).

Activities for ‘Individual Roles and Responsibilities’

Role Balancing—Balloon Toss

Equipment—Balloons (about a dozen) inflated, permanent extra-broad-tip marker

Ask the leader (preferably the senior patrol leader) to step forward. Ask the leader to name a

responsibility needed to run the troop’s program, and write that on a balloon. Hand that balloon to

the leader with instructions to keep that balloon in the air and avoid having it fall to the floor.

After a moment, repeat the question and response, write it on the balloon, and add this to the

task of keeping the balloons in the air. Repeat until the leader has too many balloons in the air and

is struggling with the "roles."

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Explain: "As the leader, you are responsible for keeping all these balloons, representing all your

roles, in the air and getting them accomplished. Would you like some help? (Response: "Yes.") Ask

someone to handle one of your roles—and give him that balloon."

Repeat the giving of new roles and passing those roles (balloons) to others until everyone in the

troop has a balloon and a responsibility.

If the group finds this activity easy, increase the difficulty by requiring them to adapt when a

leader (or two) is removed from the game, just as a Scout leader might need to take a break from a

specific role because of illness or another emergency.

Reflection—How well could the leader juggle all those balloons, and why? Why is it important

to get everyone involved so that everyone has one role to fill?

The Scout-Led Troop

Discussion: Briefly discuss leadership in Scouting and the value of the Scout-led troop.

Empowering Scouts to be leaders is one of the core principles in Scouting. Scouting is designed

to help Scouts prepare to participate in, and give leadership to, American society. A troop is

a small democracy. Within the safety framework provided by the adult leaders, and with the

Scoutmaster’s direction and mentoring, the Scouts plan and implement the troop program. Scouts

serve in positions of responsibility to make that happen.

Game: Yurt Circle. Play a teamwork game—experience cooperating as a group. (A yurt is a

circular tent of felt or skins on a collapsible framework, originated by nomads in central Asia. Yurts

are noteworthy structures because they derive their strength from having structural members that

pull away from each other under tension, making them flexible yet strong, while most structures

are supported by rigid members under compression, making them inflexible.)

Ask everyone to stand in a circle facing the middle, join hands (must be an even number

of participants, so add or subtract a trainer as needed), and expand the circle outward until all

participants feel some gentle pull on their arms from each side. Ask the participants to spread their

feet to shoulder width and in line with the circumference of the circle, then ask the group to count

off by twos. Now, ask all of the "ones" to slowly lean in toward the center of the circle, while all of

the "twos" slowly lean out (without bending at the waist and without moving their feet).

If the group works together, each person can accomplish a remarkable forward or backward

lean. Now ask the group to slowly reverse positions. There will be some difficulty, but let them

keep trying. As the trainer, do not direct how the group accomplishes the game—let them lead and

direct themselves. Get involved if you have any safety concerns.

Reflection: Lead a discussion regarding working together as a team and the purpose and

value of the Scout-led troop. Ask a few brief questions about the game, then shift into a reflection

about the Scout-led troop and how it’s implemented in your troop. Use open-ended questions

until the teaching points are all brought out.

Sample questions:

• During the game, who led the group?

• Did someone step in as the leader, or did the group cooperate as equals?

• If someone stepped up, why did the group follow his lead?

• Did the size or age of the Scouts affect how the "leaning" worked?

• Why does the Scouting program have Scouts take on leadership roles in the troop?

• What do the Scouts lead in your troop?

• What do they not yet lead?

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• What could the leadership team try to add to the list that Scouts accomplish during this

period as troop leaders?

Some key teaching points:

• Often, natural leaders will step in when a leader is needed to help the group succeed.

• Sometimes, the group can accomplish a task through group cooperation and a mutual

interest in success without a specific leader.

• Most everything in Scouting can be accomplished by Scouts of various ages and sizes

by working together as a team and perhaps making a few adjustments here and there

(e.g., by switching people around the circle or coaching a younger Scout about a

successful technique).

• Scouting gives Scouts the opportunity to learn and practice leadership skills.

• Scouts will learn to lead by practicing leading and experiencing the results of their

hands-on leadership efforts.

If there are additional challenging roles or activities in your troop that the Scouts are ready to

accept, coach them through identifying the first few steps to start implementing the change, or

identifying someone to be responsible for coordinating that effort later.

Group Discussion: Discuss the Patrol Leaders’ Council in Your Troop. If your troop has an

effective patrol leaders’ council, ask leading questions to get the group to discuss how the patrol

leaders’ council operates, and share information with Scouts who may be new to the process. If

necessary, use this time to coach the group in how a properly conducted patrol leaders’ council

meeting works.

Participants in the patrol leaders’ council plan and run the troop’s program and activities.

Composed of specific members of the troop leadership team, this group of Scout leaders meets

routinely (usually monthly) to fine-tune upcoming troop meetings and outings. The senior patrol

leader runs the patrol leaders’ council meeting, and the Scoutmaster and other adult leaders

attend as coaches, mentors, and information resources. The Scoutmaster allows the senior patrol

leader and Scouts to run the meetings and make decisions, stepping in with suggestions and

guidance whenever that will enhance the program for the troop and Scouts.

Game: Helium Stick—experience working together and cooperating as a group. Have the

Scouts stand in two lines facing each other an arm’s length away and hold out their two index

fingers in front of them at chest height. Place a light, rigid stick (e.g., a bamboo stick) horizontally

between them so the stick is resting on each Scout’s two index fingers. The stick should be

resting equally on the Scouts’ fingers. No one may grasp the stick or curl his fingertips around it.

Ask the Scouts to lower the stick to the ground as a group with no fingers losing contact

with the stick. Every Scout’s fingers must remain in contact with the stick while it is lowered. If

someone’s finger comes off the stick, restart the group at the starting position and try again.

Note: The tendency is for the stick to rise because the collective force used to keep fingers in

contact with the stick is greater than the gravitational force (weight) of the stick. For this reason,

use a stick for the exercise that is light enough for this effect to occur, given the number of people

in the group.

There are many ways of improvising the needed stick—any rigid, lightweight stick or tube will

do. The more Scouts involved, the heavier the stick can be, but it’s important the stick is not too

heavy to outweigh the lift tendency. You can use other materials than sticks—a hula hoop will also

work if you can get all the Scouts around it. Other ideas for sticks include interconnecting tent

poles, taped-together houseplant sticks or kite struts, straightened-out wire coat hangers, wooden

dowel rods, bamboo poles, and fishing rods.

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If the group is successful quickly, try some variations on the game:

• Start with the stick at ground height, raise it to shoulder height, and lower it back to

the ground.

• Issue two sticks per team—one finger for each stick.

• Just before starting the exercise, ask team members to press down hard with their

outstretched fingers onto the edge of a table for 30 to 60 seconds. This confuses the brain

still further and increases the tendency for the stick to rise.

Reflection: Lead a discussion regarding working together as a team and the purpose and

value of having the Scouts as the leaders of the troop. Ask a few brief questions about the game,

then shift into a reflection about how the patrol leaders’ council is implemented in your troop. Use

open-ended questions until the teaching points are all brought out.

Sample questions:

• Why did the stick rise when we wanted it to go down?

• Did you anticipate the problem? How did you fix it?

• How did you deal with people’s fingers losing contact?

• During the game, who led the group? Did someone step in as the leader, or did the group

cooperate as equals?

• Have the patrol leaders’ council meetings been running as effectively as they could?

• Do Scouts in leadership positions usually come to the patrol leaders’ council meetings

well prepared?

• What would the group like to do differently or improve during this leadership term?

• What guidance and coaching do you want to share with the newest members of the

leadership team?

Some key teaching points:

• The stick has a tendency to rise because the collective force used to keep fingers in

contact with the stick is often greater than the gravitational force (weight) of the stick.

• Cooperation, teamwork, and coaching each other were likely keys to everyone getting the

stick to settle down and being able to manage the stick to the ground together.

• Coach the Scouts through developing possible ways to implement their improvement ideas

for the patrol leaders’ council meetings.

Leader Comments: Just as adult leaders must step back and enable Scout leaders to lead the

troop, senior Scout leaders must work with, train, and encourage less-senior Scout leaders in the

troop to fulfill their roles and practice their own leadership skills.

Discuss Leadership: Ask the Scouts to define leadership. Introduce the troop position

description cards. Give each Scout the card for his role.

Topics to emphasize during this discussion include:

• Teamwork

• Using each other’s strengths

• Not trying to do it all yourself

• Doing what you said you’d do

• Being reliable

• Keeping each other informed

• Being responsible

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• Caring for others

• Delegating

• Setting the example

• Praising in public, criticizing in private

• Leading yourself

Group Discussion: Review some tips for being a good leader in the troop. Rather than reading

this list to the group, ask leading questions to get the Scouts to develop most of these tips and

ideas themselves. Consider having the scribe, historian, or another Scout write the tips on a

whiteboard, chalkboard, or easel pad as the Scouts come up with their ideas.

Keep your word. Don’t make promises you can’t keep.

Be fair to all. A good leader shows no favorites. Don’t allow friendships to keep you from

being fair to all members of your troop or patrol.

Be a good communicator. You don’t need a commanding voice to be a good leader, but

you must be willing to step out front with an effective "Let’s go." A good leader knows how

to get and give information so that everyone understands what’s happening.

Be flexible. Not everything goes as planned. Be prepared to shift to "Plan B" when

"Plan A" doesn’t work. Think about "Plan C."

Be organized. The time you spend planning will be repaid many times over.

Delegate. Some leaders assume that the task will not get done unless they do it

themselves. Most people like to be challenged with a task. Empower your team members

to do things they have never tried.

Set an example. The most important thing you can do is lead by example. Whatever you

do, your troop members are likely to do the same. A cheerful attitude can keep everyone’s

spirits up.

Be consistent. Nothing is more confusing than a leader who acts one way one moment

and another way a short time later. If your troop knows what to expect from you, they will

more likely respond positively to your leadership.

Give praise. The best way to get credit is to give it away. Often a "nice job" is all the praise

necessary to make a Scout feel he is contributing to the efforts of the troop.

Ask for help. Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You have many resources at your

disposal. When confronted with a situation you don’t know how to handle, ask someone

with more experience for some advice and direction.

Game: Willow in the Wind. Play a game to get the group up and moving after the discussion and

to continue to develop trust and confidence together as a team.

Have the Scouts stand shoulder to shoulder in a circle with one person (the "faller") standing

rigid (arms crossed with elbows on chest and fingertips at shoulders) and trusting in the center.

Remaining rigid, the center person falls slowly in any direction. Before the faller moves very

far off center, the people in the circle redirect the faller’s impetus to another arc of the circle.

This fall-catch-push sequence continues in a gentle fashion until the center person is relaxing

(but remaining rigid) and the people in the circle have gained confidence in their ability to work

together toward handling the occasional weight shift of the faller. Change Scouts in the center until

everyone has had an opportunity.

Introduction to Servant Leadership

Discussion: Lead a discussion of why Scouts should choose to be leaders. Ideally, the

Scoutmaster leads this section.

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Most Scouts will very quickly tell you that they would rather tell people what to do than be told

what to do. That is human nature, not just the nature of a Scout. But leadership in the troop is not

about the title or even about being the person doing the telling.

It is about a choice to lead. It is about a choice to give rather than to receive. What we

need to build into the makeup of our Scout leaders is the concept of servant leadership. We trust

effective leaders because they care about us and about helping others succeed. That is the true

role of a leader—helping other members of the troop succeed. Servant leaders understand what

success looks like not only for the group but for each member of every team. They do everything

they can to help the troop and each member succeed.

Servant leaders help the troop through day-to-day operations and through all the chores and

tasks that must be accomplished. Duties are delegated and roles assigned. Troop leaders help

manage this process. They focus on how to make every member successful in assigned tasks so

that the troop will come together quickly as a team.

Servant leaders want to lead because they know they can help make a difference and provide

a better experience for every individual.

Reflection: Lead a discussion about servant leadership. Use open-ended questions until the

teaching points are all brought out. Sample questions:

• What do you think the phrase "servant leadership" means?

• Why do you think Scouting encourages us to be servant leaders?

• What does that mean to you? How can you be an effective servant leader in your role?

• Is servant leadership focused on the team, the individuals, or both/all?

• What do you think other members of the team think of a good servant leader?

• How can a Scout serve as a servant leader? What are some examples?

Some key teaching points:

• Servant leadership is about making the choice to lead, to give more than you receive, and

to make a difference.

• Effective servant leaders care about others, about helping others succeed, and about

making the group successful.

• It is important to build up the idea and value of servant leadership in our Scout and

adult leaders.

• A good group leader is focused on the success of the members of his team—as individuals

and as a team. Servant leaders understand what success looks like not only for the team as

a whole, but also for each member of the team.

• Group members can see when a leader cares about their needs and is focused on their

success. That service earns him the group’s respect. When he has that respect, the Scout

has earned the title and role of leader.

• A troop leader who seeks to serve knows his troop members well enough to help them

succeed, helps his troop through its day-to-day operation, manages and delegates troop

duties, focuses on how to help all members be successful in their assigned tasks, and

works to bring the troop together as a team.

• Servant leaders want to lead because they know they can help make a difference and

provide a better experience for every individual.

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Module Two—Tools of the Trade

Module Overview

Content Time

Introduction to the Tools of the Trade Session—5 minutes

Communications—20 to 30 minutes

Planning—20 to 30 minutes

The Teaching EDGE—15 to 25 minutes

Preparation

• Compose a sentence for the Telephone game, or select one from the sample sentences.

• Prepare a simple drawing for the Whole Picture game.

• Pick a simple skill to teach during the Teaching EDGE demonstration. Gather any materials

needed for the demonstration and for the Guide and Enable portions of the training.

Materials

• A sheet of paper and pencil for each participant for the Whole Picture game.

• Materials required for the activity chosen for the Teaching EDGE demonstration, if any.

Learning Objectives

This module teaches the basic leadership tools of communication, planning, and how to use the

Teaching EDGE effectively in one’s leadership role.

Core Module Training

Introduction to the Tools of the Trade Session

Discussion: Introduce the three core topics in this module:

Communications—The skills of being an effective listener and an effective communicator

are valuable tools for any leader.

Planning—Proper planning makes the difference in almost all Scouting activities.

Teaching EDGE—The Teaching EDGE method can be used any time a leader is helping

others learn.

People grow and evolve their leadership skills and strengths over time. Understanding some core

leadership skills will help the Scouts as they perform their leadership roles and develop their own

individual leadership strengths. The skills of communicating, effective planning, and teaching are

foundational to each Scout’s ability to lead his fellow Scouts.

Communications

Discussion: The Greek philosopher Aristotle broke communications down into three parts:

A sender—A message—A receiver. This is still a valid model today. It applies to all forms of

communication: verbal, written, music, film, signaling, pantomime, teaching, etc.

Receiving (Listening). Understanding the value of being a good receiver is a helpful foundation

for a leader. Start with a short listening game.

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Game: The Telephone Game. Break the group into two teams. Ideally, there are six to 10 Scouts

in each team. If it is a larger session, use three teams. Have the Scouts in each team line up

so they can whisper to their immediate neighbors but not hear any players farther away or any

players on the other team.

The trainer whispers a message to the Scout at the beginning of the line. Use the same

message for each team. The Scout then whispers the message as quietly as possible to his

neighbor. Each Scout can say the message only once—no repeating is allowed. (If needed,

a variation of the game is to allow each listener one chance to ask the sender to repeat the

message.) The neighbor then passes on the message to the next Scout. The passing continues

in this fashion until it reaches the Scout at the end of the line, who then whispers the message he

received to the trainer. Once both teams have completed passing their message, the last Scout in

each line says the message he received out loud.

If the game has been "successful," the final message will bear little or no resemblance to the

original, because of the cumulative effect of sending and receiving mistakes along the line. Some

possible sample messages:

• Barbara’s aunt shared her secret sweet potato pie recipe with me.

• Goofy grinning gophers gobbled gigantic grapes while juggling.

• Johnny, can you please pick up the pencil that you dropped, and please remember to take

your homework with you to school tomorrow.

• Send reinforcements; we are going to advance upon the port tomorrow at five.

• I asked them what they were working on when I talked to them at the party yesterday.

• I told Carolyn that I thought she would probably be hired.

Reflection: Lead a discussion about effective listening and the value of using listening skills.

Use open-ended questions until the teaching points are all brought out.

Sample questions:

• What’s the difference between hearing and listening?

• What is active listening?

• Is active listening a helpful/useful skill?

• Why do leaders need to be good listeners?

• What would have happened in the game if someone hadn’t passed the message on? What

happens in the troop when someone doesn’t pass the message on?

• In the game, did you check for cues that the listener understood your message? How?

• How would it have helped if you could have asked questions?

Some key teaching points:

• Listening is different than hearing—it involves actually receiving the message being sent.

• Focus on the person who is speaking and on what is being said. Stay engaged.

• Engage your brain when someone else is talking or communicating.

• Being a good listener is a very important part of being a good leader; you need to

understand what people are trying to say to you.

• Using active listening skills will help you as a leader.

• Pass the word—to your people or to the leadership team. Don’t break the

communications chain.

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Other discussion:

• Listening is one of the most important skills a person can learn.

• Active listening can involve repeating or reiterating what you’ve heard back to the speaker.

• A good rule of thumb is to try to listen twice as much as you talk.

• Confirm receipt of your message.

• If you are the receiver, ask questions. If you are the sender, encourage the receivers to ask

questions until they are clear.

Some listening tips:

• Listen with your eyes as well as with your ears. Watch for nonverbal cues.

• Avoid distractions, both physical and mental. Give the speaker your full attention.

• Try to see things from the speaker’s point of view. In other words, try to put yourself in the

speaker’s shoes.

• Apply the ideas to yourself. Think about how the speaker’s message relates to you and

your experiences.

• Review the speaker’s points and think what logically might come next in the message.

• Curb your desire to talk until the speaker has finished.

• Respond nonverbally (nod your head or smile) to the speaker.

• Practice listening with respect for the speaker. Work hard not to interrupt even when you

have a burning desire to make a point.

• Ask questions if you are unclear about anything.

Sending a Message. Conduct a communications game. Experience the value of sending a clear

and effective message.

Game: The Whole Picture. Give every Scout a sheet of paper and pencil. Select one Scout to

be the communicator. Show him (and only him) a drawing you have made. (Prepare in advance

a simple drawing with sufficient variety to challenge the group. Simple geometric designs—

rectangles, circles, triangles, stars, lines, etc.—in various orientations can suffice. Alternatively,

select a picture from a magazine for a greater challenge. Two sample drawings are available in

diagrams 1 and 2.) Their task is to describe the drawing verbally so each Scout can duplicate the

drawing on his own sheet of paper without ever seeing the original. The better and clearer the

communicator’s instructions are, the closer the receivers’ drawings will be to the original. After the

communicator has finished his instructions, the participants should share their drawings.

If time allows, try this with and without allowing the listeners to ask questions of the

communicator. As an added challenge, play the game using two-way radios or telephones, with

the communicator in a separate room or location from the listeners (or on opposite sides of a large

room like a gym).

Reflection: Lead a discussion about effective communication and the value of communicating

clearly. Use open-ended questions until the teaching points are all brought out. Sample questions:

• Do the receivers’ drawings look like the original drawing/picture?

• Did you draw what the communicator said?

• Were the communicator’s instructions clear? What sorts of things could he have said to be

more clear?

• Ask the communicator: Did you plan how you were going to describe the drawing? How?

• Would it have helped if you could have asked questions?

• What happens when the message isn’t clear?

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Some key teaching points:

• Be as clear as possible with your message.

• Plan ahead and prepare.

• People will do what they think you told them—even if it’s not what you meant.

• Allow your listeners to ask questions and get a clear understanding of your message.

Other discussion:

• You may want to ask your listeners to tell you what they think your message is—to confirm

that they received it correctly.

• As the sender, the message often seems clearer to you than to the receiver.

• Messages flow both ways—from sender to receiver and back. Both sender and receiver are

responsible for good communications to work.

Some communicating tips when passing out information:

• Before you begin to pass out information to your troop/audience, take a moment to

organize your thoughts. You may want to write a few notes to remind yourself of the points

you want to cover.

• Have the troop/audience gather in a place free of distractions. Do not begin until you have

everyone’s attention. You can use the Scout sign as a signal that it is time for everyone to

stop other discussions and focus on the business at hand.

• Speak clearly. Make eye contact with your listeners. As you finish explaining each item, ask

if there are any questions.

• Repeat facts such as dates, times, and places.

• If possible, ask the troop scribe to make and distribute notes of the discussion.

Leader Comments. To help remember the three important parts of communications, think of

"MaSeR": Message, Sender, Receiver. A laser sends light and a MaSeR sends messages.

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Diagram 1

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Diagram 2

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Planning

Discussion: Second only to communicating, good planning is an essential skill for every effective

leader. As new Scout leaders, you will quickly notice that things you thought "just happened"

in the troop are usually actually the result of someone—perhaps now you—planning ahead and

preparing for it to happen. Generally, the better planned an activity, the more fun the group will

have and the more successful the event will be. Conversely, everyone suffers when the person in

charge has not planned properly for the group to participate in an activity.

At its core, planning is really just thinking ahead—thinking ahead about what’s needed to get the

outcome you want to have happen. In planning Scouting activities, usually the desired outcome is

that the planned activity is successful—and that the participants had fun and learned or experienced

something. Planning is figuring out what it will take to make that come together smoothly.

Ask questions—develop answers: To start planning, it often helps to sit either alone or in

a small group and start asking yourself questions—then coming up with the answers. Like a

newspaper reporter writing an article or a policeman solving a case, walk through some basic

who, what, when, where, and how questions: What do we want to do? What is the desired

outcome? Where is a suitable site? How will we get there? What will we do once we get there?

What equipment do we need? Where do we get that equipment? Who is responsible for getting

the equipment? Who is participating? When is the activity? Do we need permits or permission?

What will we do if . . .? Etc.

The questions vary considerably depending upon the activity, but the process is the same. The

more questions you can think up ahead of time, and the more answers you develop, the smoother

the activity will be.

After you get through the basics in planning the activity, spend a good part of your time

thinking through some "what do we do if ‘x’ happens?" kinds of questions. That will help you be

prepared when things don’t go as originally planned.

Also, focus on the "who": "Who is responsible for making that part happen?" or "Who will bring

that item?" Sometimes teams work out a good plan, but then the leader doesn’t assign specific

owners to every needed task. Figuring out what’s needed is an important part of planning, but

assigning someone to take care of it is essential. Be certain that someone is assigned to get every

needed task done—don’t presume that "someone" will step up and take care of something.

Experience. Practice planning by having the Scouts plan as a group a sample troop service

project using the scenario below. Explain the scenario to the Scouts, then give them 10 to 15

minutes to plan in a group how they would approach the activity. After they have established their

plan, let one or more of them summarize the high points for the group. Then transition into the

reflection: As a team, discuss how the planning activity went.

Note: As the trainer, stay engaged with the learners as they are doing their planning together.

If they are not clear about the types of questions they should be considering, or not effectively

developing answers/solutions or assigning owners, gently coach or ask them leading questions

to get them on track. Avoid the temptation to drive the activity, though. Conversely, if the group is

doing well in their planning, gently raise the bar by asking a few deeper or "what if" questions.

Scenario

On a Saturday, six weeks from now, the troop will conduct a service project at a local city park.

The project involves:

• Installing 50 feet of split-rail fence around a tree (to protect it)

• Removing old plants and undergrowth from a nearby area (approximately 500 square feet

in area)

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• Laying down weed block in the cleared area

• Spreading 6 cubic yards of mulch in the area just cleared and under the fenced-in tree

• Planting 15 to 20 small plants and shrubs in a small garden in a third area nearby

The three work areas are close enough to each other that they are within line of sight and

earshot of each other. The city will provide the wood and hardware for the fencing, the plants for

the garden, the weed block, the mulch, and several trash receptacles for the removed materials.

The troop will bring 22 Scouts and six trained adult leaders. Four unregistered parents will also

participate in the project work party. The troop participants must provide any equipment needed

to do the work. Plan to start and finish the work on that one Saturday.

Task: Plan what equipment you need for the project and how you’re going to get it. Plan how

to use and manage your team on the day of the project. Some additional "what if" questions/tasks

for teams that are doing well in the planning process:

• What if the park planner wants additional work done on the day of the project—can you

cover more?

• What if they also asked that you install a drip irrigation system for the newly planted plants?

What additional equipment would be needed? How many people would you assign to

that task?

• What if one of the areas was NOT within sight and earshot of the other two projects? What

considerations would be needed? How would you allocate your adults? What equipment

would help you address that issue?

Reflection: Lead a discussion about planning this activity and planning activities in general.

Use open-ended questions until the teaching points are all brought out. Sample questions:

About the planning session:

• Who led the planning discussion? Did that work?

• Did anyone take notes?

• What did the team focus on first? Was that an important thing to focus on?

• What happened during the team’s planning process?

• Did you ask yourselves key questions? Did you develop any answers?

• Did you get through some necessary planning activities?

• What else still needs to be planned to make this project a success? Are there areas you

didn’t get to?

• Is 10 to 15 minutes enough time to plan a project of this size?

About the project:

• Who was assigned to lead the overall project and coordinate the work effort during the

project?

• How did you divide up the troop to work the service project? Did you divide up by patrols,

by skill level, by age, or by some other method?

• Who was in charge of each of the teams?

• How did you allocate the adult leaders to the teams? What about the parents?

• How much time did you estimate the project would take with this number of participants?

• What safety considerations did you plan for?

• What were your plans for food (snacks, drinks, lunch, etc.) during the project?

• How did you plan to communicate among the various teams?

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• Were any special skills needed to do this project? Was there someone in the troop with

these skills? If not, did you consider finding out how to do those skills before the day of

the project?

• What were your considerations for poor weather? Was there anything in this project that

couldn’t be done in the rain?

• What equipment did you put on your equipment list? (If anything significant is missing from

the list, coach the team about what else is needed.)

• Did you assign someone in the troop to bring every item on the list?

• Did you assign someone to check before the project that the Scouts are still planning to

bring each needed piece of equipment?

• What equipment did you tell every person to bring?

Some key teaching points:

About the planning session:

• Pick someone to lead the planning process.

• Designate a scribe. Write down the plan.

• Plan your planning—focus on important things early in the planning process.

• Plan your planning—identify the big areas that are going to need to be thought about and

make sure you cover each one thoroughly.

• Think through some key questions in each area.

• Develop answers to each question.

• Write down tasks that need to be accomplished to make the project a success.

• Assign owners to each task.

• Assign due dates as appropriate.

• Assign someone to follow up and verify that needed things are getting done.

• Take enough time to plan well. If you don’t have enough time initially, schedule more

time later.

• Do not presume needed things will "just happen."

About the project:

• Pick someone to lead the project, ideally the senior patrol leader.

• Assign age-appropriate tasks to each group.

• Have enough activity to keep everyone busy and engaged in the project. Ensure everyone is

fully participating—and given an opportunity to participate.

• Divide up the adults. They should be coaching and mentoring the Scout leader of each

team—not leading the team themselves.

• Place skilled adults with the teams needing greater skill (e.g., building the fence or properly

planting the plants) to help the Scouts learn and be successful. If no one in the troop knows

how to build the fence or plant the plants, make arrangements to learn these skills ahead of

time—or ask someone to join you for the project who can teach the Scouts.

• Always consider safety factors when working on service projects or other Scouting

activities. (Discuss specific considerations for this project with the team.)

• Every Scout should be instructed to bring his outdoor essentials whenever the troop is

doing an activity of this nature. Personal safety gear, like work gloves or eye protection,

should also be considered for service projects.

• All of this project can be done in the rain. No need to cancel the project for (reasonable)

bad weather.

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• A variety of equipment is needed for this project, but none of it is beyond what many

families have for home use. Make a good list, then assign owners to either bring each item

or to track down someone else who could bring it. Delegate. Use the troop leadership

team—can the quartermaster or senior patrol leader drive this activity? Or perhaps the

Scouts in charge of each team?

Leader Comments. When planning an activity, it helps if you don’t presume—don’t presume

that something needed will be there or that it will just happen; don’t presume that someone will

take care of something because it seems obvious or because he usually does it. Include that

responsibility in your plans and assign an owner. Check on it—then you’ll know that it’s taken

care of.

As you become more aware of the value of planning and how it can affect the success of

activities, you may also notice when others in your troop—either Scout leaders or adult leaders—

have not put enough time or effort into planning the activity. Recommend the members of the

troop find ways to provide constructive feedback to each other to ensure that those who don’t

properly plan are coached that it is not OK—everyone suffers when the person in charge of

making something happen doesn’t plan properly. You will also see who on the team is good at

planning—get them into positions to coach and help others learn this important skill.

As a senior patrol leader or other key member of the troop leadership team, you can often tell

how well people think you are planning by how many of them keep attending your activities—

meeting, outings, etc. If the number of faces looking back at you in formation each week starts

to dwindle, it may be due to many factors, but consider that it may be that you’re not planning

enough entertaining and engaging activities for the Scouts—and they are spending their time

elsewhere. If this starts happening, actively—and quickly—make changes in your planning efforts.

Ask for feedback—what do others think? If you feel that you’re doing all you can or that you

are running out of ideas, ask for help. When you DO put in the proper planning time, the Scouts

will see that you care enough about them to put your energy into planning the best possible

experience for the troop—they will see you as a leader.

Teaching EDGE

Discussion. The EDGE (Explain, Demonstrate, Guide, Enable) method is the primary training

method to teach skills in the troop. EDGE should be used for all teaching opportunities. Make it a

habit. It can be used anytime a leader is helping others learn.

The four-step EDGE process is a simple method for teaching any skill:

1. Explain—The trainer explains how something is done.

2. Demonstrate—After the trainer explains, the trainer demonstrates while explaining again.

This gives the learner a clear understanding of what success looks like.

3. Guide—The learner tries the skill while the trainer guides him through it. The trainer gives

instant feedback as the learner practices the skill.

4. Enable—The learner works independently under the watchful eye of the trainer. The trainer

helps remove any obstacles to success, thus enabling the learner to succeed.

Experience. (This is an ideal part of the training for an experienced, NYLT-trained Scout

to conduct.) Briefly teach the Scouts a simple skill using all four steps of the EDGE method.

Set a good example by distinctly using all four steps of the process so the Scouts can clearly

differentiate.

Some possible sample skills to teach:

• How to build/fold a paper airplane

• How to properly fold the U.S. flag (refer to page 31, of the BSA publication Your Flag)

• How to tie a knot

• How to perform a basic first-aid activity

• How to toss a small object into a coffee can from a short distance

• How to properly lace up a hiking boot (or tie a shoe)

Some of these skills will need more or less equipment than others. Be sure there is

enough equipment available for all of the learners to participate in the Guide and Enable steps

simultaneously. The goal of this part of the training is to teach about teaching, not necessarily to

teach a new skill, so the subject being taught need not be an elaborate one—and need not be

something the learners don’t already know how to do.

Reflection. Lead a discussion about teaching skills using the Teaching EDGE method. Use

open-ended questions until the teaching points are all brought out.

Sample questions:

• What happened during the Explain step? What happened during the Demonstrate step?

• What happened during the Guide step? What happened during the Enable step?

• Did parts of the training go too fast or too slow for you? What could the trainer do to

address that?

• Did the learners ask questions? Did the trainer answer them?

• Did the trainer ask questions of the learners to ensure they were following?

• How did the trainer know the learners had learned the skill?

• What other skills could we teach using this method?

• How could you as a leader use the EDGE method with your troop or patrol?

Some key teaching points:

• For some skills, the Explain and Demonstrate steps can be combined.

• For some skills, the Guide and Enable steps might be merged.

• Watch your learners and ensure your pace matches their rate of learning.

• Trainers should ask questions or use other methods to ensure their learners are learning.

• The Teaching EDGE can be used in a variety of teaching situations in the troop.

• Leaders in the troop can use the Teaching EDGE method in many different ways—in more

ways than just teaching simple skills.

Leader Comments. So many Scouting skills and activities can be taught using the Teaching

EDGE method. Consider giving it a try the next time you need to teach your patrol or troop how to

do something. With practice, this method will become easy to use and a natural skill for you to use

in many situations.

When planning to teach something, it helps to think about what outcome you want: What do

you want your audience to learn? Other good questions to consider: Who is the audience? What

do they already know about this subject? What are the critical things to be taught? What is the

best order in which to present your major points? How will you present these various points? What

teaching aids will you use? Etc.

Wrap Up the Tools of the Trade Session

Discussion. These three topics—communications, planning, and teaching—are core skills leaders

can use any time they are working with their team. The links between the three skills are clear.

Good planning is foundational to everything, including teaching and communicating. Effective

communication skills enable the leader to share ideas and direct the team’s activities. As you grow

in Scouting and take on more leadership roles, your leadership skills and strengths will continue to

grow over time.

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Module Three—

Leadership and Teamwork

Module Overview

Content Time

Introduction to Leadership and Teamwork Session—5 minutes

Teams and Team Characteristics—5 to 10 minutes

Stages of Team Development and Styles of Leadership—15 to 25 minutes

Inclusion—10 to 15 minutes

Leadership Ethics and Values—15 to 25 minutes

Vision—5 minutes

Wrap Up the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops Course—5 minutes

Preparation

• Identify examples/experiences to use for the Stages of Team Development discussion.

Ideally, these come from recent troop experiences, but sports or orchestra analogies will do

if examples from the troop aren’t available.

Materials

• White board or pad of easel paper

• Baking potatoes or rocks—one per Scout

• Cookies or small pieces of candy—enough for two pieces per Scout plus a few extras

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this session, participants will

• Understand the dynamics of team building, the stages of team development, the

relationship of team development to team vision and goals, the selection of an appropriate

style of leadership for the team and condition, and valuing every team member’s

contributions and development.

Core Module Training

Introduction to Leadership and Teamwork Session

What do we mean by "team"? The word "team" applies to any group working together on a

common goal. It can be a temporary group that meets once to solve a particular problem, or it

can be a permanent group. In Scouting, the team could be the patrol leaders’ council, a group of

backpackers, or an entire troop.

Just because we call something a "team" does not mean that the group functions effectively

AS a team. Some individuals may be pulling in different directions, communicating poorly, or

treating each other badly. A high-performing team works well, energizes and supports all of the

team members, and produces highly effective results. A team working poorly is a source of stress

and tension, and productivity suffers from the lack of cooperation. Whether in sports, in the troop,

or in life, teamwork is a common factor in all effort and human interactivity.

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Discussion: Introduce the core topics in this module. The purpose of this session is to focus

on the team as a whole and the role of the leader in bringing out the best in that team. We will

discuss different kinds of teams and the stages that all teams go through as they progress toward

their vision of success. We will teach the Scouts the need for interdependence among team

members, how to find the value of every team member, and how to capitalize on the strengths of

each individual to contribute to the success of the group. We remind them that all leadership has

its underpinnings in values and discuss ethical decision-making. Last, we revisit the vision that the

Scouts have been thinking about for their roles and for the troop.

Teams and Team Characteristics

Group Discussion: Lead the Scouts through a series of very brief discussions about teams.

What do we mean by "team"? The word "team" applies to any group working together toward a

common goal.

A team can be a temporary group that meets once to solve a particular problem, or it could

be a permanent group. Name some permanent or temporary teams in the troop. In Scouting, the

team could be the group going on a particular outing, the group planning an activity, the troop

leadership team, or the entire troop.

Just because we call something a "team" does not mean that the group functions effectively

AS a team. What makes a "team" of people stronger/different than simply a "group" of people? A

team works toward a common goal. All members work together for a common purpose and for the

betterment or advancement of each member, too. A high-performing team works well, energizes

and supports all of the team members, and produces highly effective results.

What are some characteristics of effective teams? (Try to draw out some of these answers from

the Scouts, rather than listing them all as a "lecture" from the trainer.) Consider writing some of the

answers/ideas on the board.

• Common Purpose

—A team is a group of interdependent people who cooperate to achieve exceptional

results. They have common purpose for which they are all accountable.

—The goal must be clear to all.

—Members feel a common purpose; their personal goals are linked to the team goals.

It’s a win/win.

• Interdependence

—A team cannot be successful unless all members of the team are truly successful in

their roles.

• Appropriate Roles, Structure, and Process

—People know their roles and boundaries—and their value to the team.

—Decisions are agreed upon and supported.

—Feedback is timely and useful.

—Communications channels are open.

• Leadership and Competence

—Members have the necessary technical and interpersonal skills to accomplish their tasks

and work together.

—The team has the leadership and support it needs to be successful.

• Team Climate

—The team environment is open and collaborative.

—People show respect and trust for one another, and they value different opinions.

—There is a genuine interest in gaining agreement.

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• Performance Standards

—The team sets high standards and monitors itself for continuous improvement.

—Team members critique their own performance and decisions against a high standard.

• Clarity and Understanding of Boundaries

—The team has a clear understanding of its task and the limits of scope for accomplishing

the task.

—The vision for accomplishing the goals of the team and the methods to be used are

understood by all.

Game: Integrity Game—Part 1, Setting the Stage. Sometime during the first 15 to 20 minutes of

Module Three, put out a tray of cookies or small wrapped candies for the Scouts. Before putting

out the tray—and without the Scouts seeing you—count the number of Scouts in attendance.

Then count out enough cookies or candies so each Scout can get two pieces, plus have a few

more (one to four) pieces left over on the tray. The Scouts should not be aware of this counting

and preparing. Simply put the tray out and tell the Scouts that they may take two pieces any time

during the session as a reward for their participation in the class.

Stages of Team Development and Styles of Leadership (Leading EDGE)

Stages of Team Development. Teams go through various stages of development as they come

together. Individual people go through the same stages—and their natural ups and downs—as

they take on new tasks or roles. To get a better sense for how this might work in a team, let’s first

look at how it works in us as individuals.

Discussion. Lead the group through an interactive discussion of the stages of development as

they apply to an individual. Use open-ended questions to draw the Scouts into the discussion and

cover the teaching points.

Let’s look at where each of you is as you begin to take on your new leadership role for the

troop. Let’s focus on two important elements that change as we face a new task: skill level

and enthusiasm.

Sample questions:

• You’ve each recently been selected to hold a leadership role in the troop this term. You’ll

get new authority and new opportunities and experiences. How’s your enthusiasm right

now—high? (Yes.) Does taking on the new position seem kind of exciting? (Yes.)

• But do you actually know how to handle the role yet? (Probably not.) You’ve seen others do

it, but is your personal skill high or low right now? (Low.)

• Soon, if you haven’t already, you’ll each sit down with an adult leader or the Scout who

had your position before and start learning the details. You may find that there’s a lot to it

and that it seems kind of hard. For example, if you’re the quartermaster, you may suddenly

realize that there’s a lot more to do behind the scenes to help make an outing successful

than it looked like when you were just a participant. What might happen to your enthusiasm

for the position? (It will likely go down. It may not seem like such a good idea to have been

picked anymore.)

• Then what happens? You get more into the role, start doing it once or twice. You realize that

it’s not impossible, that you can get the hang of it, and that you’re able to be successful

and help the troop. What’s happening to your skills as you serve as quartermaster for a few

outings and meetings? (They are improving.) What happens to your enthusiasm? (It goes up.)

• After a while, many of you will get quite good at your new role. You’ll know what to do

and how to do it—and you’ll start thinking about ways to take it up a notch during your

term. What will have happened to your skills? (They will be high.) What will happen to your

enthusiasm? (It will be high.)

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Some key teaching points:

• When starting out, enthusiasm tends to be high and skills tend to be low.

• Then, as a person learns more about the needed tasks and realizes that he doesn’t

necessarily have all the skills or resources (time, people, etc.) to handle the position easily,

enthusiasm tends to drop. Skills are generally only slightly improving as the person learns

more about what’s needed and how to do it.

• Once a person starts making progress and having some successes in the position, his skills

and enthusiasm will start going up.

• Then, as the person gets into the role and develops more skills, his enthusiasm will grow, too.

Leader Comments. This flow of enthusiasm and skills is quite typical—for people as they take

on new roles and for teams as they come together as a team. Let’s look at the same flow from a

team perspective.

Lead the group through an interactive discussion of the stages of development as they apply

to a team. Compare the group enthusiasm and skill stages to the individual stages you just

discussed above. Draw out that the stages are the same. The teams will go through the same

stages as they come together as a team that each Scout will experience in his new position.

Where the Group Is

• Starting out (skills are low; enthusiasm is high)

• Becoming discouraged (skills and enthusiasm are low)

• Making progress (skills and enthusiasm are rising)

• Finding success (skills and enthusiasm are high)

Team Skill Level and Enthusiasm

Skill Level—Generally, the skill level of the team starts low and increases as the team

grows together and gets better at working as a team.

Enthusiasm—Often, unlike skill level, enthusiasm usually starts out high but can then

take a sudden dip. Then, as the team members explore their differences and align their

expectations with reality, the team begins to achieve results and enthusiasm begins to

rise again.

Ultimately, both enthusiasm and skill level are high as the team becomes a high-performing team.

Discussion: Lead the group through an interactive discussion of how a leader can assist the

team through the stages of development by how he interacts with the team. Use open-ended

questions to draw the Scouts into the discussion and cover the teaching points. Keep this section

interactive, rather than a lecture.

How can a leader help the team? Now we know what stages we as individuals go through, and

we see that they are similar to the stages that teams will go through as they come together. What

can a leader do to help the team—or individual team members—through the stages?

As with the Teaching EDGE, the Leading EDGE enables a leader to help team members learn

and grow as they strive toward a goal. The four stages are the same: Explain, Demonstrate, Guide,

and Enable.

Sample questions:

• When the team—or person—is just starting out, what leadership method would help the

team best? (Explain) Why?

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• What next? Once the team or person starts becoming discouraged (skills and enthusiasm

are low), how can the leader change styles to help? What style would work in this stage?

(Demonstrate).

• Then the team starts to gel, working hard together and getting a sense of accomplishment.

What style can a leader use in this stage? (Guide).

• In the final stage (skills and enthusiasm are high), as the team becomes a high-performing

team and finds success together, what style can the leader use? (Enable.)

Some key teaching points:

• When the team is starting out (skills are low; enthusiasm is high), a leader can use the

Explain method to assist the team. The same is true for an individual learning a new skill.

Often, the best way a leader can help the team through the first stage is by Explaining what

the group needs to get done and helping get every team member on the same page.

• In the second stage, the team’s productivity is still low—but, hopefully, on the rise—and

morale can also drop as team members realize what must be done and with whom. This

stage is often filled with tension, conflict, and power struggles.

• As the team starts to come together in the second stage and starts to become discouraged

as they understand the needed tasks, the leader can shift into Demonstrating—showing the

team how to do the needed tasks and where they are headed.

• Usually, a team will get through these early stages quickly. An effective leader can help the

team move through more quickly and with less distress. The leader’s team-building skills

can have a significant impact.

• In the next stage, the team is making good progress and there is an upswing of both

attitude and accomplishment. Everyone gets moving in the right direction, but sometimes

there are still some grumblings or interpersonal challenges among the team members.

• With skills and enthusiasm on the upswing in this stage, the leader can start shifting into

Guiding mode, coaching the team and team members in taking charge of the effort.

• In the last stage, the team finds success together. The leader can shift to an Enable style.

There are a lot of smooth-flowing interactions, and the team is achieving its goals.

• It’s time to let go and Enable the team to function on its own. Make it a smooth transition

and help them see their success.

• Different teams may proceed through different stages at different speeds. A stage can last

for a moment or a month, or it can be skipped instantaneously forward or backward.

Leader Comments. Recognizing the various stages enables the leader to use appropriate

leader styles to smooth the progress of a team as it evolves. With a greater understanding of this

individual and team development, Scout leaders can better apply the best Leading EDGE skills at

the right time to help their teams. We can modify how we lead the team based upon the stage of

development it is in.

Teams don’t start as effective high-performance teams; they grow as they come together as a

team. A new team leader changes the dynamics of a preexisting team, such as when a new group

of troop leaders steps in. The new leadership team will want to pay close attention to what stages

the troop is in as the new leadership team ramps up.

Inclusion

Discussion. As a leader, learning to effectively include, engage, and use each member of your

team is an important skill. Leaders want to look at their team and see how best to involve and use

the skills of every person, not just a few friends or the strongest individuals. Leaders also want to

understand the needs and goals of each individual person and how all the members of the team

can help each team member achieve their individual goals.

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Game: The Potato Game—valuing the characteristics and abilities of each individual.

• Distribute one uncooked baking potato to each participant. (Alternatively, distribute one

rock to each participant—ideally use rocks with some character and personality.) Do this

somewhat solemnly to make it more of a gag.

• Next, ask each Scout to look at his potato and "get to know it and its positive features."

Give the Scouts a minute to get to know their potatoes. (The point here is to get each Scout

to look at his potato and identify either personality traits or distinctive features that make

that potato unique and special.)

• Next, ask each Scout to introduce his potato to the group, pointing out its unique size,

shape, and other characteristics.

• Once all the potatoes have been introduced, put them all in a bag or box and mix them up.

Return a potato randomly to each person. Then have everyone try to find his original potato.

Reflection. Lead a discussion about everyone being unique and how good leaders know

and appreciate the special qualities and abilities of all members of the group. Use open-ended

questions until the teaching points are all brought out.

Sample questions:

• What do you think this activity was all about? What happened in the game?

• Every potato was alike in some ways. In what ways are we like each other?

• How do these similarities help us get things done? How could they get in the way?

• Every potato was different in some ways. What about differences? How are we different

from one another?

• How can differences strengthen the group as a whole? When can differences prevent a

group from reaching its goal?

• If a leader keeps going to the same people (friends or experienced Scouts) to get things

done, what can be lost?

• How could we find out about the special qualities and abilities of each member of our troop?

Some key teaching points:

• As people, we have many similarities. These similarities can help us get many things done

in the troop.

• Like potatoes, each person also has unique traits. These unique differences can be useful

assets to the team and to the leader when you’re trying to get things done.

• Leaders need to find out about and use these unique strengths and differences for the good

of the group.

• If a leader keeps going to the same people repeatedly, then the talents of others may be

missed. Also, those who are able but less experienced may not get a chance to grow and

get enough experience to fully contribute.

• Leaders should think about the value of each person on the team. Find out how to best

employ them for the good of the team and the good of the individual.

• Leaders don’t always go to the same person to get things done. They vary the participants

and give multiple people chances to learn, grow, and contribute.

• Everyone has strengths of some sort—leaders seek out ways to find them.

Show the Scouts a picture of a variety of rocks (included in the appendix). The picture has

cement blocks, round river stones, granite slabs, colored stones, etc. Ask which rock would be

best in the foundation of the house? Why? Which would be the best to make a kitchen counter?

A garden path? Explain that all of these rocks are similar and yet different—and each brings a

different value to the future home and garden that will be built.

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Leadership Ethics and Values

Group Discussion. Refer to the Boy Scout Handbook and review the Scout Oath and Scout Law

and what they mean. Each phrase in the Scout Oath and word in the Scout Law is broken out and

briefly discussed. The focus is on what Scouts are agreeing to as individuals when they say the

Scout Oath or the Scout Law.

In this section, lead a discussion with the Scouts about how they can and should view the

concepts in the Scout Oath and Scout Law as Scout leaders. They have been selected to take

on leadership roles in the troop. Ask them to consider how the elements of the Scout Oath and

Scout Law apply to them now as leaders. The specifics of this section should be tailored to the

leadership maturity of the troop. A high-performing troop can approach this section differently than

a troop beset by behavior issues. Use this section to grow and focus the new Scout leadership

team toward leading well and setting a good example for others.

Break out each phrase of the Scout Oath individually and discuss it together briefly—with a

focus on applying it as a leader in the troop. At the end of each phrase, add "as a leader" or

"in my leadership position."

Scout Oath

On my honor I will do my best

to do my duty to God and my country

and to obey the Scout Law;

to help other people at all times;

to keep myself physically strong,

mentally awake, and morally straight.

Some key reflection and teaching points:

On my honor . . . as a leader: As a Scout leader, a Scout must, above all, be honorable

in what he says and does. More Scouts will now be watching you—watching how you act

and assessing whether you are a man of honor at all times. A Scout leader also steps up and

encourages others to do the honorable and right thing. You will find occasions where you see

others doing less than honorable things—set the example as a Scout leader and intervene. By

giving your word, you are promising to be guided by the ideals of the Scout Oath.

. . . I will do my best . . . as a leader: As a Scout leader, do you cut corners and shirk

responsibilities? Or do you stand up, do your best, and lead your team to do its best? Every time?

Try hard to live up to the words of the Scout Oath. Measure your achievements against your own

high standards and don’t be influenced by peer pressure or what other people do.

. . . to do my duty . . . as a leader: You now have new and additional duties as a Scout leader.

There will be days or times when you’d prefer to not bother doing these duties—perhaps you’d

rather play a game with the other Scouts or relax and do nothing with the others. The other Scouts

will know what kind of leader you are by whether or not you step up and do your duty, even when

you’d rather not.

. . . to God and my country . . . as a leader: Are you serving as best as you can? Are you

setting the example for your team? Are you encouraging others to serve well, too? Your family

and religious leaders teach you about God and the ways you can serve. You do your duty to

God by following the wisdom of those teachings every day and by respecting and defending the

rights of others to practice their own beliefs. Help keep the United States a strong and fair nation.

When you work to improve your community and your home, you are serving your country. Natural

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resources are another important part of America’s heritage worthy of your efforts to understand,

protect, and use wisely.

. . . and to obey the Scout Law . . . as a leader: The 12 points of the Scout Law are

guidelines that will help you do the right thing—throughout your life, and right now while you’re a

Scout leader. The Scouts you are leading will watch whether you are living and acting according to

the Scout Law—and whether you are leading your fellow Scouts to do the same. When you obey

the Scout Law, other people will respect you for the way you live, and you will respect yourself.

. . . to help other people at all times . . . as a leader: There are many people who need you.

Are you helping others—on your team and in the other patrols? Are you helping the leaders above

you? Below you? Are you helping the Scoutmaster and senior patrol leader run the troop—or

are you being less than helpful? Is your patrol helping the senior patrol leader, assistant senior

patrol leader, quartermaster, or adult leaders when there are things that need to get done for the

troop? By helping out whenever possible, you are doing your part to improve your troop and your

community.

. . . to keep myself physically strong . . . as a leader: Take care of your body so it will serve

you well for an entire lifetime. Are you in good enough shape to participate and lead? Could you

do better? Are you encouraging those in your patrol to participate in activities and to develop

nutritious patrol meals on outings? Are you setting the example? Are you eating nutritious foods,

getting enough sleep, and exercising regularly to build strength and endurance? Do you wear your

uniform correctly? Is your uniform shirt buttoned and tucked in at all times? Are you setting the

example in uniform? Are you avoiding harmful drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and anything else that can

harm your health?

. . . mentally awake . . . as a leader: Are you developing your mind and body? Be curious

about everything around you, and work hard to make the most of your abilities. Are you learning

about your Scout leadership position? Is there more you can learn? Is there more you can try to do

in your leadership role? Are you encouraging your team to grow and develop?

. . . and morally straight . . . as a leader: Are you an honest and open leader? Are you treating

everyone fairly—and ensuring that the other Scouts are doing the same? Are you letting others

bully or harass some Scouts? Are you letting (or leading) other Scouts behave poorly? To be a

person of strong character, your relationships with others should be honest and open. Respect

and defend the rights of all people. Be clean in your speech and actions, and remain faithful in

your religious beliefs. The values you practice as a Scout will help you shape a life of virtue and

self-reliance.

The Scout Law. As in the Boy Scout Handbook, break out each word of the Scout Law

individually and discuss it together briefly—with a focus on applying it as a leader in the troop.

Remember, the Scout Law is for everyone. Before each point of the Scout Law, insert "A Scout

leader is."

For example:

• A Scout leader is trustworthy . . .

• A Scout leader is loyal . . .

Continue to work through each word of the Scout Law as you did the Scout Oath, encouraging

the Scouts to emphasize positive leader traits and to make good choices.

Game: Integrity Game—Part 2, Reflection. Thank the Scouts for playing this game (although

they didn’t know it was a game at the time). Count how many pieces of candy or cookies are

left on the tray. Does it look like no one took more than his share? Each person was to take two

pieces, no more. Is that what happened? If needed, sort out whether someone perhaps didn’t take

two pieces or if someone left early. Get a sense for how many pieces should be left.

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Depending upon the outcome, discuss with the team their success at choosing the course of

trustworthiness—even when candy or cookies are involved—or, perhaps, their need to continue to

grow as responsible leaders.

Do not call out the Scout or Scouts who took more than two pieces. Do, however, make the

point that true values are those that we practice when no one is looking.

Leader Comments. When Scouts are out in the community, each Scout is representing all of

Scouting at that time and place. Each Scout is representing every Scout who’s ever joined—and

helping parents decide (positively or negatively) whether they should encourage their child to join

Scouting. Whether in a public campsite, hiking in the woods, at a rest stop, or stopped at a gas

station or restaurant, each of us represents all of Scouting to the people who see us. To the public,

we are Scouting.

• Are we showing the best side of Scouting?

• Do we act like good Scouts?

• Are we helpful and friendly?

• Are others seeing us bullying or being rough with each other?

• Are we treating nature respectfully, or are we damaging or taking something?

• Are we treating the property of others with respect?

• Are we obeying the rules? Are we behaving safely?

• Are we showing the ethics and values of the Scouting program?

As leaders, we can—and should—ensure that the Scouts around us are showing the best side

of Scouting . . . at all times.

The Servant Leader. What is the relationship between a leader and the team? Many people’s

first reaction is to state that the team "works" for the leader, performing tasks for one person.

When this happens, the leader isn’t simply a leader, but more like a "boss" or an "owner." Many

people don’t want to be part of a team that works this way, and they’ll only join them for the sake

of external rewards, like a salary.

In a true team, the leader is one part of the team, and this role isn’t necessarily any more

important than the role of any other member. Being a team leader means accepting responsibility

for the team, its members, its objectives, its reputation, its morale, and more. Being a team leader

means serving the team.

When a leader recognizes that he is responsible to the team (and not the other way around)

and acts accordingly, he becomes a "servant leader." Servant leaders lead teams that people want

to join. Servant leaders use a variety of leadership styles based upon the needs of the team and its

objectives.

A servant leader needs to enable the success of those led, remove barriers for them to the best

of the leader’s ability, and create an environment for the team to succeed.

Many of the leadership examples you’ve seen in your lives aren’t servant leaders, they’re

"bosses" and "commanders." These kinds of leaders are rarely chosen by a team’s own

membership to lead them but are imposed from outside. The modern workforce is making this

kind of leadership less valuable. As people become more skilled and capable, they expect more

respect for their actions and capabilities, more input into decisions, and more interactions with

their leaders. They need more service.

In your lives today and in the future, you will have many opportunities to lead. If you accept

the role of a servant leader, you’ll find that teams will seek you out to lead them, your advice and

opinion will be sought, and your team members will also grow and succeed.

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44

To be a servant leader to a high-performing team, you’ll need to listen carefully: Be attuned

to the people around you, and empathically understand what they’re thinking. The servant leader

knows his team’s capabilities and desires.

At the same time, servant leadership is more than just a consensual approach. Leaders need

to lead— to set direction and lead team members in that direction. Sometimes they need to

hold team members to account, to make tough decisions that some won’t always like, and to

encourage (push) people to excel. Sometimes, this is uncomfortable—for the leader and for team

members. If leaders don’t do this, however, teams may become too "cozy"; they may lose their

edge and start to fail their customers—the real reason teams exist.

From a point/counterpoint perspective, servant leaders:

Need to listen and know when the time for discussion is over.

Achieve consensus and know when to preserve things that are good without foundering in

a constant storm of question and reinvention.

Set/maintain standards and know when to reject what does not maintain those standards

or the team vision.

Serve their customers and know how to make a difference with the team.

Please think about how you can be a servant leader in your current role in the troop.

Vision

Take this time to discuss the troop’s vision of success. Ask: How will we use our leadership skills

to help reach this success? Offer to help any new Scout leader with suitable goals to achieve

success in his new role.

Wrap Up the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops Course

Thank the Scouts all for attending, and congratulate them on their new roles in the troop. Remind

them that you and the other adults and senior leaders are there to help them be successful.

Encourage them to go forward in their new leadership roles and lead the Scouts in the troop.

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45

Appendix

Alternative Games

Activities for "Leading a Team"

Alternative Teamwork Game: Everybody Up

Play a teamwork game—experience working together and cooperating as a group. Ask two people

of approximately the same size to sit on the floor or ground facing one another, toe to toe, knees

bent, and their hands tightly grasped. From this position, ask the duo to try to pull themselves into

an upright standing position without moving their feet. Once they are successful, add two more

people, and continue until the entire group is included.

Blindfold Walk

Equipment—various pieces of furniture arranged in a maze-like obstacle course; cloth for

making blindfolds.

Create an indoor obstacle course in the meeting room. Sketch the layout and devise a

challenging path in which the team members must walk. Include some obstacles to step over,

as well as some to duck under (if possible). Don’t make it so difficult that the course might raise

safety issues, but make it challenging.

Explain: "Your team’s objective is to get all members through the maze of obstacles in the

shortest amount of time. Your team leader has a specific map that must be followed and he will

be giving you directions and instructions. Please put on your blindfolds and listen carefully to your

team leader."

Give the team leader the map, and allow the leader to organize the team to accomplish the

task—e.g., have team members go as individuals through the maze, or have them line up with a

hand on the shoulder in front of them doing each "hazard" as a group.

Reflection—How well did your leader guide you through the maze with only verbal

instructions? Can you suggest a more efficient (or more timely) way to complete the course?

How do you feel about completing the obstacle course?

Pirates and Cannibals

Equipment—Three chairs to denote seating in a boat; descriptive element to denote two shorelines.

Identify two opposite shorelines—about 5 feet apart. Place the chairs in the center to denote

the boat that goes back and forth between the opposite shores. Create two groups of equal count

(leader can play to make count even)—one group of "pirates" and the other group of "cannibals."

Explain: "Pirates, your objective is to take your captive cannibals safely across this body of

water (pointing) to your home island (pointing to other side). Your mode of transportation is this

boat (pointing to chairs), which accommodates only three people at a time. You’ll get in and out of

the boat to identify who’s on board either going or coming from your home island.

"Your booty—the cannibals—are very dangerous. If you are alone with one, the cannibal will

eat you. If you are outnumbered by the cannibals, they will eat you. The boat may be manned by

one person, but don’t let a cannibal be left alone anywhere as he will escape . . . and maybe take

the boat! Given the rising tide, you need to get everyone to the safety of your home island in the

next 10 minutes. Any questions? Begin."

Monitor to make sure cannibals do not outnumber pirates on either shore or in the boat, and

that cannibals are not left alone. After 10 minutes, end the activity.

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Reflection—Did the cannibals eat all the pirates? If so, why? What did you do (or not do) to

get everyone across? What would you do next time?

Human Train Track

Equipment—Six to 10 smooth hardwood dowels (or yardsticks) about 3 feet long; blindfold.

Pair the team members and give each pair one "railroad tie." Several pairs, each holding a

railroad tie and standing close together, form the train track. A designated "train" is blindfolded,

starts at one end of the track, and proceeds from one tie to the next. Once the train passes,

the pair holding that railroad tie may leave that position and go to the front end of the tracks,

extending the train track length indefinitely.

Explain: "Your objective is to lay sufficient track as to have the blindfolded train get from here

to there (a destination in the room). Being railroad tracks, you cannot speak—of course! Once the

train has passed, the railroad ties may move to the front of the tracks so as to extend the tracks’

length. Any questions?"

Note: The direction of the track may change at any time (make a right-angle turn, for example).

Obstacles may be added, and the height of the railroad ties may also vary.

Reflection—Train, how well did you trust the direction your track was laid toward arriving at

your specific destination? Any challenges? Tracks, why did you choose to change direction (or

height), and how did you communicate that change?

Communication Games

Match This Example

Equipment—Two sets of matching toy blocks (about 10 blocks per set), one set arranged

haphazardly on a table in another room, the other in a sack or plastic bag; two walkie-talkies,

sketch pad with pencil; sheet of 8½-by-11-inch paper for each set of blocks.

In a second room away from the meeting place, arrange the blocks on a table on top of the

sheet of paper (used for orientation)—a haphazard pyramid with a few arrayed on the table top;

some blocks with letters/numbers facing forward, others facing whichever way. If possible, have

a few similar letters but of different colors arranged to create additional challenge (e.g., "move the

red ‘T’ to the center . . ."; "have the blue ‘T’ facing . . .").

Explain: "Your team’s objective is to exactly duplicate a set of toy blocks arranged on a table

in the next room with the set of blocks and this piece of paper I’m giving you. Your arrangements

must be exact—the way it is laid out, the positioning, everything about it. You will have only 10

minutes to complete the task, which includes a maximum of two minutes to devise an appropriate

plan to accomplish your task.

"The difficulty is that only two of you will be allowed into the next room to view the assembled

set. The added challenge is that only one of the two of you may speak to the rest of the team—

and then only from that room. Any questions? (If asked, the two can speak to each other while in

that room, but only one may speak to the rest of the team)."

If asked, "There are no restrictions on how to communicate assembly instructions. A set of

walkie-talkies is available—so you won’t have to yell from room to room. And a sketch pad is

available, too. The room with the other set of blocks is (down the hall on the left). But you will have

only 10 minutes total to complete your task … beginning now."

When ready, have the team leader and one other team member (with a walkie-talkie) go into

the other room where the table display is assembled. Watch the time carefully, and reassemble the

entire team at the end of 10 minutes.

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Reflection—How well did you complete your task? Any challenges? Did you consider any

other ways of communicating what the blocks in the second room looked like? And if so, what

did you do? (Take a cell-phone picture and send it to another team member.) How would you

reorganize who was doing what to complete your task (more effectively)?

Silent Puzzle

Equipment—A set of five envelopes, each containing certain tangram puzzle pieces.

Form the group into teams of five participants (fewer is OK; someone will have two envelopes).

Have each team sit at a table so they can all see the space in front of each of them and all can

reach each other. Instruct the team that they are not to communicate with words in any way (no

speech, hand signing, writing, etc.), and that they’ll be allowed to communicate only in a very

specific way.

Distribute a set of envelopes to the team members. Inside each envelope are tangram

puzzle pieces (made of paper or cardboard, using the set of provided patterns). Explain that the

objective of the team is for each person to construct a complete square in front of them, with no

extra pieces. No one is allowed in any way to "ask" for a piece from anyone else (no speaking,

gesturing, grunting, tapping, etc.), but everyone is allowed to give a piece to anyone (this is the

only allowed active form of communication) and everyone is allowed to watch anyone else work.

Most groups solve the entire puzzle in 10 to 20 minutes (a few don’t, most often because

they’ve dropped a piece on the floor). Many groups bend the rules about communicating,

especially "asking for pieces," and that needs to be reinforced (directing someone else to give

away a piece is also disallowed). Inevitably, there are questions about the objective: "Yes,

everyone will have a square"; "Yes, everyone’s square will be the same size"; "No, there are no

extra pieces"; "Yes, there is a solution" (more than one, in fact).

Reflection—What happened? Did you solve the puzzle? Did you solve the puzzle as

individuals? Could the puzzle be solved as individuals? Tell me how you felt. Who had the two

giant triangles; you solved your puzzle in two seconds, but what happened then and how did you

feel? Who had the two squares; were you confused about the objectives? Who had the envelope

with all the little pieces? Who had the envelope with the three weird shapes? As a team, did you

employ a strategy to complete the puzzle? Was there conflict at any time?

Variations for group size:

• If you have four participants, give envelopes 1 and 2 to one person.

• If you have six or seven participants, direct two people to share envelopes 4 and/or 5.

• For eight or more participants, divide the group into sets of four or more.

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Silent Puzzle Solutions

Solution Set 1

Solution Set 2 (This set has variations: a large triangle may be swapped into the fifth block, and

the two small parallelograms may be swapped into the third or fourth blocks.)

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Instructions for Making Your Own Silent Puzzle Kit

You can copy and cut out the set of 6-inch squares provided. You may adjust the sizes freely, as

long as all pieces are scaled the same in all dimensions. Try to not leave any printed intersections

visible on cut-out pieces (they give hints).

It works very well to make 8-inch square kits (or even larger), but we can’t easily print that size

for you on standard paper. If you can cut out the pieces from large squares, there won’t be any

lines left over to give hints. It’s even better to make several sets at once using different colored

sheets. You’ll need to randomize the pieces between kits so that the solution squares aren’t all

one color.

Shapes required to make one kit:

A: One medium square (the diamond in the center of a full square)

B: One small square (one quarter of a full square)

C: One rectangle (one half of a full square)

D: Two large triangles (one half of a full square)

E: Two medium triangles (one quarter of a full square)

F: Ten small triangles (one eighth of a full square)

G: Three large parallelograms (a pair forms a chevron filling a full square)

H: Two small parallelograms (one large parallelogram sliced in half)

A set of five envelopes contains:

1: Two D’s (This person will complete the task instantly and probably get frustrated waiting.)

2: One A and one B (This person will be instantly confused about the rules.)

3: Two E’s and seven F’s (This person has solutions available but has the parts everyone

needs.)

4: One C, one G, one H, and one F (This person can almost solve his own puzzle and will likely

try to.)

5: Two F’s, two G’s, and one H (This person can also almost solve his own puzzle and will likely

try to.)

Pieces for a kit of up to 9-inch squares will fit well into five 9-by-12-inch manila envelopes, and

those envelopes will fit into a 10-by-13-inch envelope along with these instructions, making an

entire kit.

It helps to mark the pieces with labels indicating which envelope they go back into for

future courses.

I n t r o d u c t i o n t o L e a d e r s h i p S k ills f o r T r o o p s

Troop Organization Chart

Example for a Small Troop

Scoutmaster

Senior patrol

leader

Assistant

Scoutmaster—

new-Scout

patrol

Assistant

Scoutmaster—

Venture patrol

Assistant

senior patrol

leader

Patrol leader

Patrol leaders’

council

Den chief

Assistant

patrol leader

Quartermaster

Patrol leader—

Venture patrol

Troop guide

New-Scout

patrol leader

I n t r o d u c t i o n t o L e a d e r s h i p S k ills f o r T r o o p s

Troop Organization Chart

Example for a Large Troop

Scoutmaster

Senior patrol

leader

Assistant

Scoutmaster—

new-Scout

patrol

Assistant

Scoutmaster—

Venture patrol

Patrol leader Patrol leader Patrol leader

Patrol leaders’

council

Den chief

Assistant

patrol leader

Assistant

patrol leader

Assistant

patrol leader

Instructor

OA Troop

Representative

Quartermaster

Scribe Librarian Historian Chaplain aide

Junior

assistant

Scoutmaster

Troop guide

New-Scout

patrol leader

Assistant

senior patrol

leader

Patrol leader—

Venture patrol

Leave No

Trace trainer

Webmaster

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Merit Badge Counselor troop Report  http://www.scouting.org/filestore/pdf/4439.pdf

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